ShareThis Page

State weatherization effort helps Bridgeville homeowner

| Friday, Oct. 28, 2016, 6:48 p.m.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
A worker from Weber General Contractors adds insulation to a pipe in the basement of Lori Snatchko's Bridgeville home Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. Through the federal Weatherization Assistance Program, Snatchko's home received added insulation, weather stripping on doors and window replacement free of charge.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Brian Weber of Weber General Contractors (far right) talks to Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis Davin and homeowner Lori Snatchko about the work being done to weatherize Snatchko's Bridgeville home during a tour there to show the weatherization process Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. Through the federal Weatherization Assistance Program, Snatchko's home received added insulation, weather stripping on doors and window replacement free of charge.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis Davin (front) and Brian Weber of Weber General Contractors walk through a bedroom undergoing window replacement in Lori Snatchko's Bridgeville home during a tour there to show the weatherization process Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. Through the federal Weatherization Assistance Program, Snatchko's home received added insulation, weather stripping on doors and window replacement free of charge.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Lori Snatchko talks to Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis Davin outside her Bridgeville home after a tour there to show the weatherization process Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. Through the federal Weatherization Assistance Program, Snatchko's home received added insulation, weather stripping on doors and window replacement free of charge. Work was completed that day. 'It's a blessing,' Snatchko said of the program adding she wouldn't have been able to afford it otherwise.

As days become shorter and temperatures begin to drop, homeowners start to prepare for the late fall and winter seasons.

“For low-income families, the winter months can quickly become a financial burden,” said state Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis Davin, who on Friday toured a Bridgeville home undergoing an energy audit to combat colder weather.

The tour was part of the DCED's efforts to promote the Weatherization Assistance Program, which helps reduce energy costs for eligible home­owners.

“It was a blessing,” said homeowner Lori Snatchko, who has been in her Bridgeville home for seven months.

“I was really excited about this because I wouldn't have been able to do it on my own. When I looked out and saw the trucks coming in on the street, it was awe-inspiring.”

The Weatherization Assistance Program reduces energy costs for low-income households by increasing the efficiency of homes through a federal allocation received from the U.S. Department of Energy. Those funds then are allocated to local agencies, such as ACTION-Housing, throughout Pennsylvania.

Along with Davin, representatives from ACTION-Housing, including Director Larry Swanson, toured Snatchko's home as it was being weatherized.

The program is “providing assistance to combat the challenge by providing permanent solutions to reduce energy costs and increase safety year-round,” Davin said.

A federally mandated statewide average of $7,105 is spent on individual weatherization work per home, officials said.

A seven-member crew conducted an energy audit of Snatchko's home to determine air flow leakage. Then, measures such as adding weatherstripping or insulation and window or door repair are chosen to best reduce the home's energy usage. The process can take up to a week.

During the tour, Brian Weber of Weber General Contractors was focusing on wrapping waterlines and insulating borderlines, doors and walls.

“It's all about maximizing the heat within the house,” he said.

DCED leaders estimate that more than 535,000 homes have been weatherized through the program since 1977.

Matthew Peaslee is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.