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Pair accused of endangering children, starving animals in 'deplorable' Bridgeville home

Bobby Cherry
| Tuesday, March 7, 2017, 4:21 p.m.
Bridgeville police say two children and six animals lived in 'deplorable conditions' in a Liberty Street home, including these two emaciated dogs. Police were called on Feb. 9, 2017, to the home for a report of an 11-year-old boy who was locked out of his home for 20 minutes in what police say was 20-degree weather.
Bridgeville Police Department
Bridgeville police say two children and six animals lived in 'deplorable conditions' in a Liberty Street home, including these two emaciated dogs. Police were called on Feb. 9, 2017, to the home for a report of an 11-year-old boy who was locked out of his home for 20 minutes in what police say was 20-degree weather.
Bridgeville police say two children and six animals lived in 'deplorable conditions' in a Liberty Street home. Police were called on Feb. 9, 2017, to the home for a report of an 11-year-old boy who was locked out of his home for 20 minutes in what police say was 20-degree weather.
Bridgeville Police Department
Bridgeville police say two children and six animals lived in 'deplorable conditions' in a Liberty Street home. Police were called on Feb. 9, 2017, to the home for a report of an 11-year-old boy who was locked out of his home for 20 minutes in what police say was 20-degree weather.
Animal Friends is caring for Cory — a pit bull mix who was in terrible condition in February 2017 when he was brought into the Ohio Township shelter.  Police found him and five other animals living in a home of 'deplorable condition,' Bridgeville police said.
Animal Friends
Animal Friends is caring for Cory — a pit bull mix who was in terrible condition in February 2017 when he was brought into the Ohio Township shelter. Police found him and five other animals living in a home of 'deplorable condition,' Bridgeville police said.
Bree Reitmeyer, 34, is charged with two counts of endangering the welfare of children and six counts of animal cruelty. Marcus Stancik, 30, faces two counts of endangering the welfare of a child, six counts of cruelty to animals, and one count each of possession of drug paraphernalia and aggravated assault. The two, who turned themselves in March 3, 2017, were charged by Bridgeville police in February.
Allegheny County
Bree Reitmeyer, 34, is charged with two counts of endangering the welfare of children and six counts of animal cruelty. Marcus Stancik, 30, faces two counts of endangering the welfare of a child, six counts of cruelty to animals, and one count each of possession of drug paraphernalia and aggravated assault. The two, who turned themselves in March 3, 2017, were charged by Bridgeville police in February.

Bridgeville police charged two people with child endangerment and animal cruelty after an 11-year-old boy allegedly was locked out of his Liberty Street home that had no apparent running water and rotting food in the refrigerator.

Marcus Stancik, 30, faces two counts of endangering the welfare of a child, six counts of cruelty to animals, and one count each of possession of drug paraphernalia and aggravated assault. Bree Reitmeyer, 34, is charged with two counts of endangering the welfare of children and six counts of animal cruelty.

The two turned themselves in March 3, Bridge­ville police announced in a Facebook post last week. They are in Allegheny County Jail — Stancik on $30,000 bond and Reitmeyer on $5,000 bond — awaiting preliminary hearings.

Police said they were called on Feb. 9 to a house at 146 Liberty St. for a report of a boy locked out of his home for 20 minutes in 20-degree weather.

“The child reported to officers that he tried banging on the door with a shovel to get the attention of his mother's boyfriend who was inside,” Bridgeville police wrote. “Officers are familiar with the occupants of this residence and they are known drug users.”

Police found Stancik inside with heroin paraphernalia. He allegedly told officers “he just ‘shot up' about an hour earlier and was visibly under the influence of heroin,” according to police.

The 11-year-old and a 16-year-old girl were turned over to Allegheny County Children & Youth Services, police said.

“The house was in deplorable condition, did not appear to have running water, animal feces throughout the residence, and the toilet did not appear to be working,” police wrote. “There was no food in the residence, only a pack of spoiled chicken in the refrigerator.”

While in the home, police also found two “badly emaciated” dogs and four cats.

Animal Friends released information and a photo of one of the pit bulls, named Cory, who was given emergency medical treatment last month.

“Cory was so weak that he could not walk and had to be carried,” Animal Friends spokeswoman Shannon Tremblay said. “Upon arrival at Animal Friends, Cory received emergency medical care. He has since received two blood transfusions and is slowly putting on weight and gaining his strength back.

“Cory will remain in Animal Friends' care until he is well enough to be placed up for adoption.”

Bobby Cherry is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at rcherry@tribweb.com or on Twitter at @bc_trib.

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