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Open Streets Carnegie aims to showcase business district

| Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, 1:03 p.m.
Deborah Bandel of Simple Church in Carnegie gives a massage to Susan Nirella of Scott during the Open Streets Carnegie event on Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Open Streets is designed to encourage active lifestyles, and  highlight the borough's numerous health and wellness businesses.
Sidney Davis | Tribune-Review
Deborah Bandel of Simple Church in Carnegie gives a massage to Susan Nirella of Scott during the Open Streets Carnegie event on Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Open Streets is designed to encourage active lifestyles, and highlight the borough's numerous health and wellness businesses.

The second annual Open Streets Carnegie event aims to provide residents and visitors an opportunity to explore the business district's renaissance.

West and East Main streets will be closed from Jefferson Street to Washington Avenue during the event, which is 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 23.

“Last year, we had an excellent crowd and people had a great time,” Carnegie Mayor Jack Kobistek said. “It was really neat to close down the streets and enjoy the town with no traffic. There's a lot of outdoor ... activities that kids and adults can all take part in.”

Local businesses such as BRN Fitness, Carnegie Health and Wellness and Keystone Physical Therapy will be putting on healthy exhibitions ranging from exercises to massages.

Other businesses will be giving lessons and instructions on yoga, dance, skateboarding and other health-conscious activities, the mayor said.

Carnegie Police Department will host bicycle safety clinics and the Boys and Girls Club will raffle off a new bicycle.

Kobistek said it takes a lot of people to make an event like Open Streets Carnegie successful.

“It's hard to put a number on the total number of volunteers,” Kobistek said. “We have a substantial number of people in the community and those that area associated with area businesses that will help out and put this on.”

Last year's Open Streets Carnegie was part of an effort to become a Live Well Allegheny community. The Allegheny County program highlights municipalities and organizations working to create healthier communities. A much larger version — Open Streets Pittsburgh — is on the last Sunday of the month from May through July.

Though he hopes for a bright and sunny autumn day, Kobistek and local officials will meet this week to discuss a backup plan if there is a threat of inclement weather that day.

“We're hoping for decent weather,” Kobistek said.

Matthew Peaslee is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

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