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Photo Gallery: Dorseyville hosts 39th Powwow at American Indian Center

Tawnya Panizzi
| Friday, Sept. 29, 2017, 10:54 a.m.
Dressed in full regalia, dancers compete in the tradition that simulates the warrior preparing for battle at the Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center in Indians Township.
Jan Pakler | For the Tribune Review
Dressed in full regalia, dancers compete in the tradition that simulates the warrior preparing for battle at the Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center in Indians Township.
Long time vendors Jodi Simms (chipmunk) and Lee Simms (shy deer ) sell jewlery, gifts and handmade dreamcatchers at the 39th annual powwow in Indiana Township on Sept 24, 2017.
Jan Pakler For the Tribune Review
Long time vendors Jodi Simms (chipmunk) and Lee Simms (shy deer ) sell jewlery, gifts and handmade dreamcatchers at the 39th annual powwow in Indiana Township on Sept 24, 2017.
Lenny Kaminski, of New Kensington, sells custom carvings and wood sculptures 


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Lenny Kaminski, of New Kensington, sells custom carvings and wood sculptures =
Dakota/Cherokee Johnny Coe at the powwow at the Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center on Sept. 24, 2017.
Jan Pakler | for The Tribune Review
Dakota/Cherokee Johnny Coe at the powwow at the Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center on Sept. 24, 2017.
Toddler Callen Simms beats on a traditional Native American drum at the 39th annual powwow at Council of Three Rivers American indian Center on Sept  24, 2017.
Jan Pakler | For the Tribune Review
Toddler Callen Simms beats on a traditional Native American drum at the 39th annual powwow at Council of Three Rivers American indian Center on Sept 24, 2017.
Native American performer Sean Jones Jr. from the Lumbee Tribe in North Carolina full regalia, including family heirlooms and sacred Eagle feathers, while competing at the 39th powwow in Indiana Township on Sept. 24, 2017.
jan Pakler | For the Tribune Review
Native American performer Sean Jones Jr. from the Lumbee Tribe in North Carolina full regalia, including family heirlooms and sacred Eagle feathers, while competing at the 39th powwow in Indiana Township on Sept. 24, 2017.

The 39th annual powwow at the Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center was filled with drumming, dance, wood carvings and traditional crafts of Native Americans.

Hundreds of spectators visited the Indiana Township festival on Sept. 24.

The Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center was conceived in 1969 when members of two Native American families in Pittsburgh wanted to maintain a sense of their culture and become more conscious of their rights as Native Americans, according to the website. In February 1972, the council was incorporated as a non-profit in Pittsburgh's Homewood section until 1976 when it moved to the Dorseyville neighborhood of Indiana Township.

Tawnya Panizzi is a staff writer for the Tribune-Review. Reach her at 412-782-2121, ext. 2, tpanizzi@tribweb.com or @tawnyatrib.

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