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Career Day at Christ the Divine Teacher Catholic Academy

Tawnya Panizzi
| Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, 10:57 a.m.
Aspinwall Police Officer visited with students at Christ the Divine Teacher Catholic Academy in Aspinwall for the school's Career Day on Dec. 4.
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Aspinwall Police Officer visited with students at Christ the Divine Teacher Catholic Academy in Aspinwall for the school's Career Day on Dec. 4.
Aspinwall Fire Chief Gene Marsico with students at Christ the Divine Teacher Catholic Academy in Aspinwall.
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Aspinwall Fire Chief Gene Marsico with students at Christ the Divine Teacher Catholic Academy in Aspinwall.

Students at Christ the Divine Teacher Catholic Academy learned first-hand on Dec. 4 what it's like to be a police officer, news reporter or fireman during the school's inaugural Career Day.

Aspinwall Fire Chief Gene Marsico and police officer Dave Nemec talked with students in kindergarten, first and second grades.

Susan Koeppen, a TV news anchor, spoke to grades three through eight.

“It was a fun and educational day where the students learned about a professional role and the dedication needed for these individuals to reach their success,” school spokeswoman Katie Lovett said.

The trio told children why education is important in achieving success, why they chose their professions, what they enjoy about the job and what inspires them.

Nemec and Marsico discussed their roles in keeping the community safe.

“They emphasized rules of fire safety, when to call 911 and how the police staff is there to protect them,” Lovett said. “Both men said they wanted to be in law enforcement from a young age and worked hard to achieve their goals.”

Students asked questions about safety equipment, the roles of emergency personnel and learned how they can give back to the community, Lovett said.

Koeppen led an engaging talk with the older students about TV news reporting. She began her career in 1994 behind-the-scenes and told students about how perseverance led to success in the industry.

Principal Mark Grgurich said she entertained the students with stories of her mistakes and live on-air problems but reinforced how important it is to move on from mistakes and rise to the challenge.

He thanked the community members who took time to share with students, saying the youngsters learned valuable life lessons.

“They learned to work hard to achieve your goals and with a lot of determination, they can succeed at anything,” he said.

Tawnya Panizzi is a staff writer for the Tribune-Review. Reach her at 412-782-2121, ext. 2, tpanizzi@tribweb.com or @tawnyatrib.

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