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Korean War orphan shares powerful story with Hampton students

| Monday, April 24, 2017, 9:00 p.m.
Katie Schell, author of “Love Beyond Measure” and her mother, Pega Crimbchin (Ok Soon Lee), 87, a Korean War orphan, spoke with history students at Hampton High School on Monday, April 17.
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Katie Schell, author of “Love Beyond Measure” and her mother, Pega Crimbchin (Ok Soon Lee), 87, a Korean War orphan, spoke with history students at Hampton High School on Monday, April 17.
Pega Crimbchin (Ok Soon Lee), 87, a Korean War orphan who endured many hardships, spoke with history students at Hampton High School on Monday, April 17, 2017
Submitted
Pega Crimbchin (Ok Soon Lee), 87, a Korean War orphan who endured many hardships, spoke with history students at Hampton High School on Monday, April 17, 2017
Katie Schell, author of “Love Beyond Measure,” speaks to students at Hampton High School on April 17 2017, about her mother, Pega Crimbchin (Ok Soon Lee), 87, a Korean War orphan and her inspirational life.
Submitted
Katie Schell, author of “Love Beyond Measure,” speaks to students at Hampton High School on April 17 2017, about her mother, Pega Crimbchin (Ok Soon Lee), 87, a Korean War orphan and her inspirational life.
Younga Reitz played background music for a slideshow as part of an event April 17, 2017, at Hampton High School with 'Love Beyond Measure' author Katie Schell and her mother Pega Crimbchin (Ok Soon Lee), 87, a Korean War orphan and her inspirational life. Younga is a Korean musician and is part of the Pittsburgh Ensemble and also director of the Pittsburgh Youth Chamber Orchestra. She read the book and volunteered to perform at their speaking engagements.
Submitted
Younga Reitz played background music for a slideshow as part of an event April 17, 2017, at Hampton High School with 'Love Beyond Measure' author Katie Schell and her mother Pega Crimbchin (Ok Soon Lee), 87, a Korean War orphan and her inspirational life. Younga is a Korean musician and is part of the Pittsburgh Ensemble and also director of the Pittsburgh Youth Chamber Orchestra. She read the book and volunteered to perform at their speaking engagements.

Katie Schell, author of “Love Beyond Measure” and her mother, Pega Crimbchin (Ok Soon Lee), 87, spoke with history students at Hampton High School on Monday, April 17.

Schell's book is about her mother's inspirational life. The memoir follows Crimbchin's life as a peasant living in Seoul, South Korea. Following the devastation of the Korean War, Crimbchin becomes an orphan and is later forced into slavery with another family. This heartbreaking tale describes years living in poverty, enslavement and unspeakable suffering, as well as finding the courage and strength that carried her from that life to one as an American citizen.

Ten-percent of book sales are given to “Women of the Wells,” an organization that builds fresh water wells in third world countries, sponsoring 16 wells to date all over the world.

There were also four members of the Korean Broadcast Company in attendance. Three are from South Korea and one from California. They are in the process of making a documentary about Pega's life and have spent several days with her and her family. They wanted to see her present at a school, so they came to the presentation at Hampton.

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