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Hampton/Shaler

Hampton grad never missed a day of school

| Thursday, May 31, 2018, 10:14 p.m.
Jonah Wyzomirski getting ready to head to the final day of school. He had perfect attendance from Kindergarten through 12th grade at Hampton Township School District
Jonah Wyzomirski getting ready to head to the final day of school. He had perfect attendance from Kindergarten through 12th grade at Hampton Township School District
Jonah Wyzomirski getting ready to drive to his last day of school. He had perfect attendance from Kindergarten through 12th grade at Hampton Township School District
Jonah Wyzomirski getting ready to drive to his last day of school. He had perfect attendance from Kindergarten through 12th grade at Hampton Township School District
Jonah Wyzomirski graduated without ever missing a day of school. He had perfect attendance from Kindergarten through 12th grade at Hampton Township School District
Jonah Wyzomirski graduated without ever missing a day of school. He had perfect attendance from Kindergarten through 12th grade at Hampton Township School District

Jonah Wyzomirski has done the ultimate feat. He's achieved perfect attendance for 13 years at Hampton Township School District (K-12), completing his final day as a high school senior May 30, according to his parents Dominic and Judy of Allison Park.

On top of that, he wasn't even tardy or had to leave early, unless for sports or other school-related activities, said his mother. And he's graduating the top 10 percent of his class with several academic honors.

The accomplishment was done with much determination and a lot of luck of not getting sick, said his dad, Dominic.

In fact, they didn't notice the trend until around the fourth grade.

“It just kind of happened. And at some point we realized he hadn't missed a day of school,” said Dominic.

Jonah noticed then, too. It was then that he said he made it a possible goal to try and graduate without missing school.

His parents said he just never got sick. And when he did it was luckily always over a holiday break. Judy said one year he had strep throat during Thanksgiving break, but he was better by the end of it return to school.

Judy said his family doctor was even amazed he never had to come in for a sick visit, only for his annual, routine well-child visit.

Jonah also said he really likes going to school. He said he'd hear about his friends wanting to stay home from school for the day to take a break and he couldn't believe it.

“I thought ‘how could you do that?' ” said Jonah, who runs cross country and track.

Mom agreed.

“He always wanted to go to school. Most kids are looking to stay home,” said Judy.

She said she always gave him the option to stay at home if he wasn't feeling well.

A few times she said he'd have a minor cold but it wasn't anything he felt should keep him home.

She said he never had an ear infection.

One year he broke his finger but that's been the most serious event.

His parents said their son does well in school with particular strengths in math and science.

To top it off, Dominic said his son only made one B, which was in second-grade art class.

Jonah said his friends didn't believe him when he was around eighth grade that he never missed and he never planned to.

When they doubted his attendance goal, which was still four years away from graduating, he said that acted as another motivator.

Dominic said Jonah's late grandfather Richard worked for the post office for 26 years and “I am pretty sure he never called in sick all those years.”

Jonah is heading to Pennsylvania State University to study aerospace engineering.

And he doesn't think his habits will change there either.

His mom agrees.

“I hope it's something he continues on through life. You have a commitment — you follow through with it,” said his mom.

Natalie Beneviat is a Tribune-Review contributor.

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