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Murrysville

Scout's Eagle project will highlight more of Export Borough's mining history

Patrick Varine
| Thursday, June 7, 2018, 9:15 a.m.
Above, a photo of the majority of coal operations at the No. 2 mine in Export. It was taken around 1918 by John Sartoris, who operated a photography business in the borough.
John Sartoris photo
Above, a photo of the majority of coal operations at the No. 2 mine in Export. It was taken around 1918 by John Sartoris, who operated a photography business in the borough.
Export Councilwoman and historical society member Melanie Litz gives remarks during the dedication ceremony for a sign erected near the former Westmoreland Coal Company fan house on Monday, Sept. 25, 2017.
Patrick Varine | Tribune-Review
Export Councilwoman and historical society member Melanie Litz gives remarks during the dedication ceremony for a sign erected near the former Westmoreland Coal Company fan house on Monday, Sept. 25, 2017.
An informative sign installed outside the former Westmoreland Coal Company fan house off Washington Avenue in Export was dedicated Monday, Sept. 25, 2017.
Patrick Varine | Tribune-Review
An informative sign installed outside the former Westmoreland Coal Company fan house off Washington Avenue in Export was dedicated Monday, Sept. 25, 2017.

A Murrysville Boy Scout's Eagle project ties in perfectly with the ongoing mission of the Export Historical Society to highlight borough history.

Troy Florian, 16, of Troop 205, wants to clear the entrance to the old Westmoreland Coal Company's No. 2 mine, located near the district court office on Washington Avenue.

Florian received approvals from both borough council as well as the Westmoreland County commissioners. County approval was required because part of the mine is located on the county-owned district court property.

Melanie Litz, a borough councilwoman and historical society board member, said the society has obtained a grant to install a second informational sign at the entrance once it is cleared.

“This is a continuation of what we started with the (coal company) fan house ,” Litz said.

The historical society dedicated a sign in September detailing the history of the fan house, which was used to bring cool, fresh air into the mine.

The borough's maintenance contractor, Dan-Mar, submitted a $6,800 bid for some of the prep and site work associated with the project. Councilman Ed Persin suggested having borough public works crews perform the work.

“There's a significant portion of sediment and gravel to be moved,” Litz said. “I don't think going in there with shovels or a tractor is the right way to go about it.”

Council consensus was to have Florian meet with Dan-Mar officials to see just how much site work the volunteers could do, in order to keep the borough's costs down.

The Export mine was the first major mine on the Turtle Creek Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The borough's first mines opened in October 1892 to ship coal to Philadelphia and New York.

Patrick Varine is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-850-2862, pvarine@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MurrysvilleStar.

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