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Northern Tier hosting wines of autumn presentation, tasting

| Monday, Sept. 11, 2017, 9:00 p.m.
On Sept. 22, beginning at 7 p.m., Northern Tier Library in Richland will be hosting wines of autumn.
On Sept. 22, beginning at 7 p.m., Northern Tier Library in Richland will be hosting wines of autumn.
On Sept. 22, beginning at 7 p.m., Northern Tier Library in Richland will be hosting wines of autumn.
On Sept. 22, beginning at 7 p.m., Northern Tier Library in Richland will be hosting wines of autumn.
On Sept. 22, beginning at 7 p.m., Northern Tier Library in Richland will be hosting wines of autumn.
On Sept. 22, beginning at 7 p.m., Northern Tier Library in Richland will be hosting wines of autumn.

John Eld has been a wine connoisseur for nearly 50 years and he's bringing his expertise back to Richland's Northern Tier Library for a presentation on the wines of autumn on Sept. 22.

Rich, colorful varieties will be on hand for tasting and could include Pinot noir, petite sirah, Malbec and even rosé.

“Our diet changes subtly as we make the transition from the summer salads and grilling into the fall and start thinking about stews, casseroles, different cuts of meat, root vegetables and things that have some earthiness and a tang, kind of like the smell of wet leaves that you get in the autumn,” he said. “You get that little nip in the air and it's a wonderful time of year for flavors and aromas, so we'll concentrate on that.”

The library has hosted several wine tastings in the past, said director Diane Illis, including a program on the wines of Downton Abbey and one on wines from the south of France. This year the program is in September as part of the Love Your Library fundraising campaign.

Tickets are $35, and the library will receive a pro-rated match thanks to the Jack Buncher Foundation.

Eld's wife cooks food pairings to go along with the wines, Illis said. And because the oenophile enjoys the challenge of finding good-tasting wines at reasonable prices, patrons can discover bottles that won't give their wallets a hangover.

“I've gone to a number of these and there are still a couple of wines that he introduced me to that I buy every time I have a special dinner,” Illis said. “He introduces you to wines that are actually affordable. There are no $50 bottles of wine here.”

Eld is a member of the American Wine Society, once hosted a radio program on wine and taught community college courses on the subject for many years.

Part of the presentation — something most people don't know about wine — is what a year in the vineyard is like and exactly how much effort goes into producing a bottle of wine.

“Even the cheapest box of wine or the stuff that comes in jugs still has to come from grapes that have to be grown, tended, cultivated, tied to their trellis wires and watched over for pests and disease, and this goes on throughout the year up until the harvest in autumn,” he said. “Then there are an enormous amount of decisions that a winemaker faces once the grapes come into the winery. There's so much to know about wine and winemaking and the grape-growing process.”

The event will being at 7 p.m.

“We do it in the library after-hours because people seem to get a charge out of it, almost like they're being naughty drinking wine in the library,” Illis said. “But it makes a nice background, too. He usually plays music as well and it's just a lovely evening.”

Space is limited and tickets often sell out, she said, so interested patrons are urged to reserve a spot either at the library or through the website, northerntierlibrary.org.

Karen Price is a Tribune-Review contributor.

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