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Torch Run teams traverse Pittsburgh's eastern suburbs to support Special Olympics Summer Games

| Tuesday, May 30, 2017, 8:15 p.m.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Jim Markel of the Monroeville Police Department carries the Special Olympics torch for the first leg of the team's run in the 2017 'Be A Fan' Law Enforcement Torch Run on Tuesday afternoon, May 30, 2017. The Monroeville team picked up the torch from Penn Hills at the Sheetz on Duff Road in Monroeville and carried it for 3.1 miles to Alpine Village for the handoff to the Murrysville team.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Penn Hills police officers participated in the 2017 'Be A Fan' Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics on Tuesday afternoon, May 30. Making their way down Route 22 to the Monroeville Sheetz off Duff Road for the handoff to the Monroeville team are Robert Meyers, Dustin Hess, Michael McGuire, Dutch Perz, Stephanie Scaglione, William Skweres, Amy Wilkinson and Lizzy Wilkinson. Joseph Snyder, David Wilkinson and Judy Arthurs lead the team in Penn Hills vehicles.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Penn Hills police Officer Dutch Perz makes the handoff of the Special Olympics torch to Monroeville police Officer Jim Markel for the 2017 'Be A Fan' Law Enforcement Torch Run on Monday afternoon, May 30, at the Duff Road Monroeville Sheetz. Monroeville carried the torch for the 3.1-mile run to Alpine Village for the handoff to the Murrysville team.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Several Monroeville police officers participated in the 2017 'Be A Fan' Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics on Tuesday, May 30. The Monroeville team accepted the torch from the Penn Hills team at the Monroeville Sheetz. Carrying the torch for the 3.1-mile leg of the run to Alpine Village for the handoff to the Murrysville team were officers Jim Markel, Pierre DeFelice, Jason, Safar, W.T. Supancic, Dan Novak, Steve Maritz, Ron Waros, Bob Renk, Vonita Renk, Jeremy Shaggs and Derek Yohman.

Teams in the Law Enforcement “Be a Fan” Torch Run for Special Olympics started the annual event on Tuesday morning at PNC Park in the North Side, and traveled east to Penn Hills, Monroeville and other areas.

Police officers from Penn Hills and Monroeville took part in what will be a three-day, 150-mile run that consists of 56 legs and ends at Penn State University.

More than 50 law enforcement teams from across Pennsylvania are expected to take part in the run, which kicks off the 2017 Summer Games in State College, according to Special Olympics. The Torch Run is to end with the lighting of the cauldron at opening ceremonies on Thursday.

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