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Late artist, blues musician Martin Miglioretti, who grew up in Penn Hills, to enter Hall of PHAME

Dillon Carr
| Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017, 2:18 p.m.
Rino Miglioretti displays many of the original pieces of artwork by his late brother, Martin Miglioretti, in his Monroeville home.
Lillian DeDomenic | For the Tribune-Review
Rino Miglioretti displays many of the original pieces of artwork by his late brother, Martin Miglioretti, in his Monroeville home.
Painting by Martin Miglioretti.
Lillian DeDomenic | For the Tribune-Review
Painting by Martin Miglioretti.
Rino Miglioretti displays a bust of horror movie villain Freddy Krueger, one of the more unusual pieces of art crafted by his late brother, Martin.
Lillian DeDomenic | For the Tribune-Review
Rino Miglioretti displays a bust of horror movie villain Freddy Krueger, one of the more unusual pieces of art crafted by his late brother, Martin.

Rino Miglioretti said his late brother, Martin, would have carried himself with humility upon finding out he would be honored Nov. 11 at the Penn Hills Arts and Music Education gala.

“He was a very modest person. He didn't talk a lot about his success and accolades, he just went on … he was not one to hang trophies up in a case,” Miglioretti said.

Miglioretti will represent his brother when the commercial graphic artist and blues music advocate is posthumously inducted into the Hall of PHAME during the group's fundraising gala. The group, which provides funding to support arts programs in area schools, has inducted 13 members in its Hall of PHAME.

“Our focus this year for fundraising is artistry and painting,” said founding member and PHAME President Margie Krogh. “Marty was someone who made it in that. He was one person that just popped off the charts.”

Martin Miglioretti was a successful artist in Houston when he died at 58 in 2013, but his talent sprouted at a young age growing up in Penn Hills, where his family worked in construction.

“He took a different role than the rest of our family,” his brother said. “He branched out and went into art. It was his thing since he was a little kid. He just had remarkable talent and not a whole lot of training.”

Miglioretti said his brother began his career as an artist in the mid-1970s after graduating from Penn Hills High School. Martin Miglioretti moved to Texas and worked there for 25 years, earning a reputation among artists and musicians. He was a founding member of the Houston Blues Society, using his graphic art skills to design its logo and create T-shirts and posters for gigs for three decades. He also won an Addy, a Houston advertising award, in 1997.

But Rino Miglioretti said art was his brother's claim to fame.

“This is done with a paintbrush and canvas,” he said while holding an acrylic painting of a chrome-finished motorcycle engine his brother made.

Miglioretti keeps his brother's life's work in the basement of his Monroeville home.

“He went to the beat of a different drum, but that was him,” he said.

Dillon Carr is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-871-2325, dcarr@tribweb.com or via Twitter @dillonswriting.

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