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Plum/Oakmont

Plum High School students' art talents on display

Michael DiVittorio
| Thursday, May 10, 2018, 6:21 p.m.
Zoe Sommer sits and sketches in front of some of her work on display in the art room at the 2018 Plum High School Night at the Arts, May 3.
Zoe, a junior at the high school, prefers to use pastel pencils and paints for most of her work.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Zoe Sommer sits and sketches in front of some of her work on display in the art room at the 2018 Plum High School Night at the Arts, May 3. Zoe, a junior at the high school, prefers to use pastel pencils and paints for most of her work.
High School educator Jeff Noll talks with Daniel McGregor and Adam Lewis, students of Simple Rick's Woodshop, about some of the woodshop items on dislay at the 2018 Plum High School Night at the Arts, May 3. Simple Rick's Woodshop makes custom crafted cutting boards, walking sticks, napkin holders, etc., from maple, cherry and oak woods.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
High School educator Jeff Noll talks with Daniel McGregor and Adam Lewis, students of Simple Rick's Woodshop, about some of the woodshop items on dislay at the 2018 Plum High School Night at the Arts, May 3. Simple Rick's Woodshop makes custom crafted cutting boards, walking sticks, napkin holders, etc., from maple, cherry and oak woods.
Jadyn Hill displays some of her finished works in the art room at the 2018 Plum High School Night at the Arts, May 3. Jadyn, a junior at the high school, likes working with paints, including acrylics and oils.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Jadyn Hill displays some of her finished works in the art room at the 2018 Plum High School Night at the Arts, May 3. Jadyn, a junior at the high school, likes working with paints, including acrylics and oils.

Plum High School students showcased their artistic prowess at the school's annual Night at the Arts.

It's a tradition going back more than 17 years,

“I think the stuff that we've done this year is equally as good as anything that we've done in the past,” art teacher Dennis Swogger said. “Every year it runs more smoothly because the kids know what to do.”

Approximately 410 students participated in this month's art show and about 400 others attended.

“This was a banner year of former students coming back and giving us input and catching up with us,” Swogger said. “It is always a treat to see the students' work displayed together and see how they have grown as artists through a wide variety of assignments and opportunities.”

Senior Kennedy Deen produced a series of still live paintings. She hopes parents are proud of their students' work.

“I always bring my family to this event and they love to see what kind of talent plum has to offer,” she said. “This year showcased multiple talented artists and even some pieces from woodshop, too. It is always nice hearing compliments on your artwork that you have been working extremely hard on and is something I will remember when I leave.”

Michael DiVittorio is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-871-2367, mdivittorio@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MikeJdiVittorio.

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