ShareThis Page
Plum/Oakmont

Plum High School students, community members take part in STEAM Playground

Michael DiVittorio
| Wednesday, May 30, 2018, 5:57 p.m.
Plum students had the chance to learn about and try drones, 3D printers, robots, virtual reality and more at the second annual STEAM Playground at the high school May 25, 2018. 
Senior Alec Robinson adjusts one of the drones on exhibit.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Plum students had the chance to learn about and try drones, 3D printers, robots, virtual reality and more at the second annual STEAM Playground at the high school May 25, 2018. Senior Alec Robinson adjusts one of the drones on exhibit.
Plum students had the chance to learn about and try drones, 3D printers, robots, virtual reality and more at the second annual STEAM Playground at the high school May 25, 2018.
Senior Alec Robinson, sophomore Josh George, and seniors Jacob George, Josh Tarzoho and Syndi Hindman operate the drones via a computer program.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Plum students had the chance to learn about and try drones, 3D printers, robots, virtual reality and more at the second annual STEAM Playground at the high school May 25, 2018. Senior Alec Robinson, sophomore Josh George, and seniors Jacob George, Josh Tarzoho and Syndi Hindman operate the drones via a computer program.
Plum students had the chance to learn about and try drones, 3D printers, robots, virtual reality and more at the second annual STEAM Playground at the high school May 25, 2018.
Fresh off the griddle, senior Jasmyn Floyd and junior Michael Visaya make pancakes with the 3D pancake printer.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Plum students had the chance to learn about and try drones, 3D printers, robots, virtual reality and more at the second annual STEAM Playground at the high school May 25, 2018. Fresh off the griddle, senior Jasmyn Floyd and junior Michael Visaya make pancakes with the 3D pancake printer.
Plum students had the chance to learn about and try drones, 3D printers, robots, virtual reality and more at the second annual STEAM Playground at the high school May 25, 2018.
Sophomore Josh George and seniors Jacob George and, Josh Tarzoho operate the drones via a computer program.
Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune-Review
Plum students had the chance to learn about and try drones, 3D printers, robots, virtual reality and more at the second annual STEAM Playground at the high school May 25, 2018. Sophomore Josh George and seniors Jacob George and, Josh Tarzoho operate the drones via a computer program.
Students get the chance to try out and learn about  drones, 3D printers, robots, virtual reality and more at the second annual STEAM Playground at Plum Senior High School Friday, May 25, 2018.  Fresh off the griddle, Jasmyn Floyd, senior, and Michael Visaya, junior, make pancakes with the 3D pancake printer. Lillian DeDomenic  |  For The Tribune Review
Students get the chance to try out and learn about drones, 3D printers, robots, virtual reality and more at the second annual STEAM Playground at Plum Senior High School Friday, May 25, 2018. Fresh off the griddle, Jasmyn Floyd, senior, and Michael Visaya, junior, make pancakes with the 3D pancake printer. Lillian DeDomenic | For The Tribune Review

Plum School District community members and high school students flew drones, printed 3-D objects and took part in other science projects as part of the school's second annual STEAM Playground.

STEAM stands for science, technology, engineering, art and math. The playground was May 25.

It was Plum's part in Remake Learning Days, a six-day extravaganza that featured more than 250 events throughout the Pittsburgh area.

“The day was a success with several hundred students, staff and community members participating throughout the day,” Principal Justin Stephans said. “The STEAM Playground has grown in number of participants and number of stations as the emphasis on STEAM learning at (the high school) continues.”

Some were able to print edible pancakes. Others virtually walked a plank out of a skyscraper, experienced World War II as a paratrooper and repaired the International Space Station while soaring 250 miles above the earth.

Participants also created light-up cards using circuits and batteries and experimented with the MegaMark robot on loan from Carnegie Mellon University.

Students taking AP computer science principles and STEAM studio helped people at each station. Senior Alec Robinson was among those with the drones.

“It wasn't like anything I've done in any of my classes,” he said. “I wanted to learn more about it and found it really interesting. I also got to play with the Hummingbird Robots and make LEDs light up by programming them. The STEAM Playground was a lot of fun and allowed me to play with tech I otherwise wouldn't get to.”

Teacher Stephanie Reilly was among the staffers who organized the event.

“As technology intersects all career fields, access to and experience with STEAM equipment and classes gives Plum students the confidence and competence they need to see themselves in technology-related fields,” she said. “Our job as educators is to prepare our students for the future so they understand and control the technology, not to send them unprepared to a future where their job is outsourced by some technology that does not yet even exist.”

The school received numerous grants throughout the year to purchase new STEAM equipment.

Administrators hope to build on the playground's success for next year's science and technology activities.

Michael DiVittorio is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 412-871-2367 or mdivittorio@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MikeJdiVittorio.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me