ShareThis Page
Sewickley

Dream board at Sewickley Academy meant to inspire students

| Monday, Jan. 16, 2017, 12:39 p.m.
Sewickley Academy third-grader Swetha Menon (left) helps classmate Alisa Sachivichik look for the best spot to place her dream for the world on a dream board at the school Friday, Jan. 13, 2017. The dream board, which will be filled by lower school students, faculty and staff,  was created in celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday and inspired by his dream for equality and peace.
Kristina Serafini | Tribune-Review
Sewickley Academy third-grader Swetha Menon (left) helps classmate Alisa Sachivichik look for the best spot to place her dream for the world on a dream board at the school Friday, Jan. 13, 2017. The dream board, which will be filled by lower school students, faculty and staff, was created in celebration of Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday and inspired by his dream for equality and peace.

Sewickley Academy Lower School librarian Sarah Wilson has a dream that her students will be inspired by Martin Luther King Jr. as they celebrate his birthday with a community display in the Marion Hutchins Library hallway.

Lower School students have been learning about King in their history classes and as a cross-curricular connection, it carried over into library class. Each student shared their dream on a piece of paper, a poster, or a note and added it to the board around King's form and the phrase “Martin Luther King had a dream for what the world could be. What is your dream for the world?”

“Children are very perceptive,” Wilson said. “It's heartening to see their purity and generosity.”

Kindergartners worked with Wilson to compile a list of their dreams for the world, including a wish “for everyone to be free.”

Fourth-graders created posters with the hopes that the people of the United States would stop arguing over politics and that everyone will live as family around the world.

The third-graders wrote their dreams for the world on blue paper clouds. As they sat huddled around tables, one student wondered if ending world hunger was an acceptable dream, which Wilson assured was “a beautiful dream.”

In addition to solving world hunger, students hoped for a cure for cancer, a cure for Alzheimer's, an end to pollution, safety and care for animals, to be a doctor for the homeless, and that no child go to bed hungry.

One boy dreamed that all girls will be treated equally with boys and have the same chances, and a girl named Isabella expressed a common thread among her classmates: “My dream is for everyone to respect others' opinions and for everyone to like each other no matter what they look like.”

As the bulletin board overflowed with blue clouds onto the wall around it, so, too, did it spread the candid, innocent dreams of the third grade.

Students, faculty, and staff will continue to write down and post their dreams on the dream board, which will remain up through Black History Month in February as a celebration of the students.

“It's been a hard year for people, and there has been a lot of ugliness following the election,” Wilson said. “Since our students are the future, I thought it was important to have this conversation. It's really beautiful how generous they have been.”

Rebecca L. Ferraro is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me