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Solar eclipse party planned in Springdale

Brian C. Rittmeyer
| Wednesday, July 26, 2017, 4:45 a.m.

A total solar eclipse will cross the continental United States on Aug. 21, and there's going to be a party for the historic event in Springdale.

The Rachel Carson Homestead and the Springdale Free Public Library will host a Total Eclipse Party from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 21 at the homestead on Marion Avenue in Springdale.

According to NASA, the eclipse path will stretch from Salem, Ore., to Charleston, S.C. The complete blocking out of the sun by the moon, revealing the solar corona, will be visible within a ribbon about 100 miles wide.

Those outside the path — which will include Pennsylvania — will still see a partial solar eclipse, in which the moon covers part of the sun's disk.

Regardless, everyone in North America will be able to experience the eclipse, according to NASA.

A total eclipse hasn't crossed the United States from sea-to-sea since June 8, 1918.

During the party, the Rachel Carson Homestead and its trails will be open for brief tours. There will be crafts and snacks. Glasses will be available for viewing, or those attending can bring a shoe or cereal box to make their own viewer.

To register, call the library at 724-274-9729.

Brian C. Rittmeyer is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-226-4701.

This map shows the path of the total solar eclipse that will cross the United States on Aug. 21. A partial eclipse will be visible throughout the United States.
NASA
This map shows the path of the total solar eclipse that will cross the United States on Aug. 21. A partial eclipse will be visible throughout the United States.
FILE - In this May 20, 2012, file photo, the annular solar eclipse is seen as the sun sets behind the Rocky Mountains from downtown Denver. The solar eclipse that is cutting a diagonal path across the U.S. next month is a boon for Missouri tourism. Some towns will have more visitors than residents on Aug. 21, 2017. Hotels and campsites are sold out as some communities are preparing for unparalleled numbers of visitors, all to observe about two minutes of near-darkness at the height of the day. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
FILE - In this May 20, 2012, file photo, the annular solar eclipse is seen as the sun sets behind the Rocky Mountains from downtown Denver. The solar eclipse that is cutting a diagonal path across the U.S. next month is a boon for Missouri tourism. Some towns will have more visitors than residents on Aug. 21, 2017. Hotels and campsites are sold out as some communities are preparing for unparalleled numbers of visitors, all to observe about two minutes of near-darkness at the height of the day. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
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