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Steelers' Le'Veon Bell serves ice cream treats at New Kensington Dairy Queen

Matthew Medsger
| Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, 9:36 p.m.
Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell shows off a Dairy Queen cone — with the curl on top — that he made while working at the New Kensington Dairy Queen on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.
Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell shows off a Dairy Queen cone — with the curl on top — that he made while working at the New Kensington Dairy Queen on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.
Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell shows he can make a proper Blizzard ice cream treat (they're supposed to be able to be held upside down for an instant without spilling) while working at the Dairy Queen in New Kensington on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.
Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell shows he can make a proper Blizzard ice cream treat (they're supposed to be able to be held upside down for an instant without spilling) while working at the Dairy Queen in New Kensington on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.
Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell offers a dipped cone to a customer at the drive-thru window at the Dairy Queen in New Kensington on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.
Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell offers a dipped cone to a customer at the drive-thru window at the Dairy Queen in New Kensington on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.
Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell hands off a Dilly Bar he made while working at the New Kensington Dairy Queen on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.
Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell hands off a Dilly Bar he made while working at the New Kensington Dairy Queen on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.
Some drive-thru customers at the New Kensington Dairy Queen likely did a double-take when Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell handed them their orders on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.
Some drive-thru customers at the New Kensington Dairy Queen likely did a double-take when Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell handed them their orders on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.
Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell traded his helmet for a Dairy Queen ball cap — and uniform/jersey — as he spent the day working at the New Kensington Dairy Queen on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.
Steelers running back Le'Veon Bell traded his helmet for a Dairy Queen ball cap — and uniform/jersey — as he spent the day working at the New Kensington Dairy Queen on Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017.

It's unclear if the skills transfer from football to frozen treats, but Le'Veon Bell can at least now list some experience on his resume next time he applies for a job at an ice cream stand.

Ahead of a Sept. 4 deal that netted the running back $12.1 million for the year, Bell joked at the end of August through social media that he needed to find work and was applying for a job at Dairy Queen.

One way or the other, despite a franchise tender making his stay with the Steelers offense definite, his references must have checked out. On Tuesday, Bell walked into the Dairy Queen in New Kensington and started his training.

Bell learned the intricacies of the Dilly Bar, mixed a few Blizzards and dipped a cone alongside his mother, Lisa (don't tell Bell, but his mom's cone-dipping skills far outstrip his own). Bell even worked the drive-thru lane, much to the surprise of waiting customers.

Jared Abraham, who along with his father, Kevin, opened the Freeport Road ice cream store about four years ago, said Bell was humble and clearly having a good time.

“I was nervous leading up to this — there were cameras everywhere, and I was shaking while making this stuff,” Abraham said. “But he was like another guy here: He was cool, he joked, he loves Dairy Queen.

“He was excited to make everything he did.”

Abraham acknowledged that the visit was not a random occurrence, but rather a planned event orchestrated by Dairy Queen corporate. Still, he was happy to be in on the joke about the state of the running back's job status.

“Dairy Queen reached out to him after he did the social media post about applying for a job,” Abraham said. “But he still seemed very excited to be here. As excited as we were to have him, he seemed just as excited.”

So, maybe the event wasn't a spontaneous visit from a football giant to hang out with his otherwise none-the-wiser fans.

But even if it was a staged PR stunt, for the few diehard football fans handed an ice cream cone by a Steeler, it truly was a rare and unexpectedly cool treat.

Matthew Medsger is a Tribune-Review staff writer.

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