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Fox Chapel Area School District employees trained to deal with various emergencies

| Monday, Nov. 6, 2017, 8:03 p.m.
Jen Swab, with the 'Stop the Bleed ' program, trains Fox Chapel Area School District workers about tourniquet application in emergency situations at the Dorseyville Middle School on Monday. It was part of an Allegheny Health Network program to train employees how to react in emergencies. More than 200 employees from all six district schools participated, Nov. 6, 2017
Jan Pakler | For the Tribune-Review
Jen Swab, with the 'Stop the Bleed ' program, trains Fox Chapel Area School District workers about tourniquet application in emergency situations at the Dorseyville Middle School on Monday. It was part of an Allegheny Health Network program to train employees how to react in emergencies. More than 200 employees from all six district schools participated, Nov. 6, 2017
Chris Skwortz gets a look and feel of naloxone nasal spray while being taught  how to use it in an emergency at Fox Chapel Area High School during a workshop concerning school safety at Dorseyville Middle School.
Jan Pakler | For the Tribune-Review
Chris Skwortz gets a look and feel of naloxone nasal spray while being taught how to use it in an emergency at Fox Chapel Area High School during a workshop concerning school safety at Dorseyville Middle School.
Neil Turco, a pharmacy resident with the New Kensington Family Health Center, and Trish Klatt, pharmacy director with UPMC St. Margaret hospital, demonstrate how to use the nasal spray form of naloxone, an opiod rescue medicine. They discussed overdose prevention as part of a workshop for Fox Chapel Area School District employees regarding student safety at Dorseyville Middle School in Indiana Township. Nov. 6, 2017
Jan Pakler | For the Tribune-Review
Neil Turco, a pharmacy resident with the New Kensington Family Health Center, and Trish Klatt, pharmacy director with UPMC St. Margaret hospital, demonstrate how to use the nasal spray form of naloxone, an opiod rescue medicine. They discussed overdose prevention as part of a workshop for Fox Chapel Area School District employees regarding student safety at Dorseyville Middle School in Indiana Township. Nov. 6, 2017
Steven Edwards, assistant principal at O'Hara Elementary School, gives an overview of his training with how to deal with a shooter -- 'A.L.I.C.E.'  (alert, lockdown, inform, counter, evacute) -- including escape plans, rather than relying on a school lockdown, Nov. 6, 2017
Jan Pakler | For the Tribune-Review
Steven Edwards, assistant principal at O'Hara Elementary School, gives an overview of his training with how to deal with a shooter -- 'A.L.I.C.E.' (alert, lockdown, inform, counter, evacute) -- including escape plans, rather than relying on a school lockdown, Nov. 6, 2017

More than 200 Fox Chapel Area School District employees attended a workshop Monday to train them for a number of emergencies that could occur in the schools.

Among the discussions about emergency response were how to administer naloxone to a person who is overdosing; how to deal with an active shooter; and how to administer first aid.

The event was held at Dorseyville Middle School in Indiana Township.

The event was presented by the Fox Chapel Area administration in a partnership with Allegheny Health Network and UPMC.

Employees from all six Fox Chapel Area schools participated.

They got hands-on opportunities to learn from Dr. Jonathan Chen, a pioneer of using naloxone for overdose intervention, along with first responders who taught emergency care and professionals from Allegheny Health Network Trauma Center with the “Stop the Bleed” program.

Jan Pakler is a freelance photographer.

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