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Valley News Dispatch

Kitten's cries lead to an adorable rescue in New Kensington

Brian C. Rittmeyer
| Thursday, May 17, 2018, 1:06 p.m.
New Kensington firefighter David Metz holds a kitten he rescued from a storm drain on Route 366 in New Kensington around midnight on Wednesday, May 16, 2018.
Submitted | Steven Matto
New Kensington firefighter David Metz holds a kitten he rescued from a storm drain on Route 366 in New Kensington around midnight on Wednesday, May 16, 2018.
A kitten looks up from a storm drain on Route 366 in New Kensington before firefighters rescued it.
Submitted | Steven Matto
A kitten looks up from a storm drain on Route 366 in New Kensington before firefighters rescued it.
A kitten walks into the open after firefighters remove a grate from a storm drain on Route 366 in New Kensington late on Wednesday, May 16, 2018.
Submitted | Steven Matto
A kitten walks into the open after firefighters remove a grate from a storm drain on Route 366 in New Kensington late on Wednesday, May 16, 2018.

A little kitten's big voice lead to its rescue in New Kensington late Wednesday.

Sometime around midnight, a couple of guys walking down Route 366 heard a kitten meowing in front of the Seventh Street Sportsmen's Club, said Steven Matto, a photographer with the Arnold Volunteer Fire Department No. 2.

It was coming from a storm drain along the the four-lane road. They called 911, and police and firefighters responded.

Matto guessed that the kitten had gone into the road, was frightened by traffic, and went down the drain when it ran back toward the curb.

“You couldn't see the cat at first. It was inside the drain,” Matto said. “You could hear it. It was loud as hell.”

When firefighters lifted the heavy grate up, the kitten peeked out from a tunnel and looked up. Matto got a picture.

Rather than run farther down the tunnel and into more danger, the kitten came out, Matto said.

A New Kensington firefighter, David Metz, went into the hole and got the kitten. The entire rescue effort took about 10 minutes.

Matto didn't know the gender of the kitten, which he described as light gray with a light tiger stripe pattern. Despite its ordeal, it seemed to be in “perfect” condition.

While one of the men who called it in wanted to keep the cat, Matto said it was going to go to Animal Protectors first, to be checked out and to find out if it's old enough to be adopted.

A representative of Animal Protectors could not immediately be reached for an update on the kitten Thursday afternoon.

Brian C. Rittmeyer is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-226-4701, brittmeyer@tribweb.com or via Twitter @BCRittmeyer.

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