ShareThis Page
Valley News Dispatch

Allegheny Valley 'Senior Stroll' inspires nostalgia, hope

Madasyn Czebiniak
| Wednesday, May 30, 2018, 3:21 p.m.
Melissa Allen, a senior at Springdale High School, hugs her brother, Tommy Allen, a student at Colfax Elementary School, while visiting with her graduating class on May 30, 2018.
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Melissa Allen, a senior at Springdale High School, hugs her brother, Tommy Allen, a student at Colfax Elementary School, while visiting with her graduating class on May 30, 2018.
Springdale High School seniors visit Acmetonia Elementary School on May 30, 2018.
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Springdale High School seniors visit Acmetonia Elementary School on May 30, 2018.
Acmetonia Elementary School students welcome visiting Springdale High School seniors on May 30, 2018.
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Acmetonia Elementary School students welcome visiting Springdale High School seniors on May 30, 2018.
Springdale High School seniors visit Acmetonia Elementary School on May 30, 2018.
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Springdale High School seniors visit Acmetonia Elementary School on May 30, 2018.
Kaydence Jones (left), 8, and Jocelyn Pater-Griggle, 8, hold a sign made for visiting Springdale High School seniors at Acmetonia Elementary School on May 30, 2018.
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Kaydence Jones (left), 8, and Jocelyn Pater-Griggle, 8, hold a sign made for visiting Springdale High School seniors at Acmetonia Elementary School on May 30, 2018.
Springdale High School senior Alicia Matthews leads her class through the halls of Acmetonia Elementary School on May 30, 2018.
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Springdale High School senior Alicia Matthews leads her class through the halls of Acmetonia Elementary School on May 30, 2018.
Springdale High School seniors depart from their visit to Acmetonia Elementary School on May 30, 2018.
Nate Smallwood | Tribune-Review
Springdale High School seniors depart from their visit to Acmetonia Elementary School on May 30, 2018.

Springdale High School seniors had the opportunity to relive the past and say farewell to the soon-to-be-closed Colfax Upper Elementary School on Wednesday as part of the Allegheny Valley School District's first “Senior Stroll.”

Clad in their black and white graduation caps and gowns, more than three dozen seniors marched through the hallways of Colfax and Acmetonia Primary School so their younger classmates could congratulate them and see what it looks like to graduate.

“They very much enjoyed it,” senior class adviser Jennifer Novich said.

At Acmetonia, all of the students and teachers lined the hallways to watch the seniors walk by. They cheered and held up signs. The seniors waved and gave high fives.

“A lot of them were very emotional when they saw the kids clapping for them and holding signs up for them,” Novich said.

The experience at Colfax was a little different because the annual Science Olympiad was happening there at the same time.

“We walked through the halls and through the cafeteria, but all the students weren't out in the hallways for us because of all the activities that were going on,” Novich said. “Ideally, and in the future, it will happen like it did at Acme, where everybody comes out and lines the halls and we parade through.”

There are 92 seniors graduating this year. Novich said a majority of them went to Colfax, which is scheduled to close at the end of the school year.

The district is in the middle of a $13 million expansion project at Acme­tonia to make room for the Colfax students, who will be moved there.

Novich said a lot of the students who participated in the stroll wanted one last chance to walk through Colfax before they graduated.

“It was nostalgic for most of them,” she said. “Most of them went to Acme as well, so going through both buildings meant a lot to them.”

Superintendent Pat Graczyk hopes the event will inspire younger students to start thinking about their futures and to have conversations with their parents that they might not have had before.

“By seeing someone in their regalia that's from their same school, went to the same elementary school, may just cause someone, a young child (to) go home and say, ‘Hey mom, or dad, what does it mean to graduate? What does it mean to go to college? What does it mean to go to work after school?' ” he said. “That's what we're looking for — to generate those meaningful conversations and for students to have a broader awareness of what the world will offer them if they decide to take different paths.”

Madasyn Czebiniak is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-226-4702, mczebiniak@tribweb.com or via Twitter @maddyczebstrib.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me