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Stanley Cup stops at Norwin, Franklin Regional, Seneca Valley, thanks to granddad

Joe Napsha
| Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017, 5:09 p.m.

Lord Stanley's most famous Cup made a visit to a Norwin elementary school Thursday, to the delight of about 460 youngsters as well as the teachers, staff, police officers and district officials who had their picture taken with the iconic hockey trophy.

“The best part of the entire day was all the people taking selfies,” said Lindsay Reed of North Huntingdon, a professional photographer who estimated she shot at least 400 photos of students, including her own two children, and adults at Sunset Valley Elementary who wanted to see and touch the Stanley Cup.

It was the same trophy that Pittsburgh Penguins superstar Sidney Crosby hoisted on the ice after the Penguins beat the Nashville Predators in June to cap a glorious 2016-17 season.

The trophy came to the school courtesy of David Soltesz, Pittsburgh Penguins Foundation president and grandfather of two Sunset Valley students — Dominic and Isabella Duffy.

“For me, it was a day of sharing the cup,” Soltesz said.

Soltesz had been at Franklin Regional High School earlier Thursday morning, where three of his grandchildren are enrolled. The keeper of the Cup — white-gloved NHL Hall of Fame employee Howard Borrow — was preparing to take it to Soltesz's next stop at Seneca Valley School District, where his other grandchildren attend.

“The Cup is a magnet. Everybody wants a picture ... a selfie” said Soltesz, who wears bold, chunky rings from Penguins' Stanley Cup championships of 2009 and 2016.

“There are kids of all ages who love the Cup,” said Borrow, who accompanied the trophy to Russia when superstar Evgeni Malkin had it for a day this summer.

Tom McMillan, vice president for communications for the Penguins, put his finger on what makes the trophy so special.

“This is the actual trophy (handed out) year after year” with all the players names on it, McMillan said. “The trophy is what you aspire to.”

Joe Napsha is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-836-5252 or jnapsha@tribweb.com.

Officers Gregory Arendas (left) and Thomas Harris post with the Stanley Cup on Thursday at Sunset Valley Elementary School.
Tribune-Review
Officers Gregory Arendas (left) and Thomas Harris post with the Stanley Cup on Thursday at Sunset Valley Elementary School.
Amy Duffy joins her father Dave Soltesz, president of the Pittsburgh Penguins Foundation, at the attendees at the Pittsburgh Penguins Foundation Wine Tasting Gala in the CONSOL Energy Center in Uptown. Dec. 9, 2014.
John Altdorfer
Amy Duffy joins her father Dave Soltesz, president of the Pittsburgh Penguins Foundation, at the attendees at the Pittsburgh Penguins Foundation Wine Tasting Gala in the CONSOL Energy Center in Uptown. Dec. 9, 2014.
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