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District raises steel at Latrobe Elementary site, eliminates marker boards

Jeff Himler
| Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017, 10:33 p.m.
Construction crews place steel beams, as work continues on the new  Latrobe Elementary School, along Ligonier Street, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction crews place steel beams, as work continues on the new Latrobe Elementary School, along Ligonier Street, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017.
Construction crews place steel beams, as work continues on the new  Latrobe Elementary School, along Ligonier Street, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction crews place steel beams, as work continues on the new Latrobe Elementary School, along Ligonier Street, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017.
Construction crews place steel beams, as work continues on the new  Latrobe Elementary School, along Ligonier Street, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction crews place steel beams, as work continues on the new Latrobe Elementary School, along Ligonier Street, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017.
Construction crews place steel beams, as work continues on the new  Latrobe Elementary School, along Ligonier Street, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction crews place steel beams, as work continues on the new Latrobe Elementary School, along Ligonier Street, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017.
Construction crews place steel beams, as work continues on the new  Latrobe Elementary School, along Ligonier Street, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
Construction crews place steel beams, as work continues on the new Latrobe Elementary School, along Ligonier Street, on Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017.

Construction is on schedule and within budget for the new Latrobe Elementary School that is taking shape on Latrobe's Old Athletic Field.

George Dickerson, project manager at the site, told the Greater Latrobe School Board last week that the building's foundation was complete and concrete slabs were poured.

This week, with much masonry work completed, a crane began raising the steel framework of the two-story building, according to Kurt Thomas, the district's director of operations and planning.

He said crews early this week created areas that will be devoted to instruction in art and music as well as science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) subjects.

“It's coming along very well,” Thomas said. “It will go very fast. You'll actually see the shape of the building. It think it will be very exciting for people to see.”

The $24.8 million school, bounded by Lincoln Avenue and Ligonier, Cedar and Cherry streets, is expected to open in August 2018 for about 800 students in grades K-6.

It will replace the existing century-old school several blocks away on Ligonier.

On Tuesday, the school board approved two change orders for the project.

The board knocked $36,200 off the building cost by eliminating some white marker boards from classrooms. Thomas said the district has opted against buying projectors that would have focused images on the marker boards.

Instead, it will install interactive flat panel TVs, covered under a separate technology budget, to serve the same function.

The board also agreed to pay Westmoreland Electrical Services $1,710 extra to add a fire alarm strobe each in the offices of the principal, psychologist, guidance counselor and nurse.

In a related matter, the board authorized administrators to seek bids for furniture, fixtures and equipment that will be needed at the new school.

School directors should approve the purchases within the next few months, Thomas said, noting, “Next spring or summer, those pieces will be coming in.”

Jeff Himler is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-836-6622, jhimler@tribweb.com or via Twitter @jhimler_news.

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