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Delmont council candidates see budget as top priority

Patrick Varine
| Friday, Oct. 20, 2017, 2:27 p.m.
The Delmont Borough building in June 2015.
Lillian DeDomenic | For the Tribune-Review
The Delmont Borough building in June 2015.
Delmont Councilman David Weber
Patrick Varine | Tribune-Review
Delmont Councilman David Weber
Democratic candidate for Delmont council William Marx
Submitted photo
Democratic candidate for Delmont council William Marx
Republican candidate for Delmont council Pamela Simpson
Submitted photo
Republican candidate for Delmont council Pamela Simpson
Democratic candidate for Delmont council Pamela Loughner.
Submitted photo
Democratic candidate for Delmont council Pamela Loughner.
Delmont Councilman Andrew Shissler
Patrick Varine | Tribune-Review
Delmont Councilman Andrew Shissler
Delmont interim Councilman Stan Cheyne
Patrick Varine | Tribune-Review
Delmont interim Councilman Stan Cheyne

The six candidates running for four seats on Delmont council want to keep a close eye on the budget and work to make the borough welcoming for families.

“I want to continue serving Delmont,” said Republican incumbent Councilman Andrew Shissler. “I want to maintain our sewage system and try to keep things financially sustainable.”

Newcomer and Democrat William Marx came home from his military deployment and decided he wanted to dip his toes into local politics.

“I just felt motivated to get involved,” Marx said. “I'd gone to a couple of the meetings just to hear about (some of the issues), and I thought, ‘I can do better than this.' ”

Marx said his priority would be “getting the fiscal house in order.”

“Any borough that has departments consistently running over their budget, to the point where basic services like a leaky sewer system are happening, it's a problem,” he said. “I'd like to publicly open the books and let everyone know what going on with our finances, where the problems are, and really, develop a community-based way to solve it.”

Incumbent Democrat David Weber said he's running because he's “a glutton for punishment.” During his time on council, Weber took the lead in negotiating and securing a borough-wide hauling contract that included recycling, but his focus also was on sewer and water issues.

“I think the sewage and the storm water issues are the biggest, along with their impact on the budget, which could be significant,” he said. “I think there's still things I can do, certainly on the sewage end of things. I can effect some control and hopefully some cost-management.”

Newcomer and Democrat Pamela Loughner said she wants the borough to do more than “maintain its status quo.”

“We have younger families moving in, and I'd like to see our town reflect the amenities those families want: more parks, better roads,” she said. “Some new businesses have come in, but there's also been some areas where the growth has been stagnant. There's four (council) seats open, and I thought, let's go for it. I'm ready to work.”

Newcomer and Republican Pamela Simpson's priorities were much in line with Loughner's.

“I feel strongly about the condition of our local roads and parks,” Simpson said. “I want to work hard to help us not only maintain our roads and parks, but to upgrade them as much as possible in the coming years.”

Newcomer and Republican Stan Cheyne brings borough experience to the table. He served on the recreation board for several years and was appointed to fill former Councilman Carl Boyd's term this summer.

“I wanted a nice place for my kids to grow up and for my wife and I to live,” Cheyne said, adding that he does not have a specific priority if he were to win election.

“I see it as up to the community,” he said. “I know there are some issues with sewage inflow and infiltration and storm water runoff, and those things are important. But I want to know what the community's interested in as well.”

Patrick Varine is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-850-2862, pvarine@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MurrysvilleStar.

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