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Kenny Chesney works to clean up St. John as Pittsburgh officials tamper tailgating mess

Gloria Ruane
| Monday, Nov. 6, 2017, 5:27 p.m.
Kenny Chesney performs in Pittsburgh during his Spread The Love Tour, Saturday July 2 at Heinz Field.
Kenny Chesney performs in Pittsburgh during his Spread The Love Tour, Saturday July 2 at Heinz Field.
Piles of trash litter a Heinz Field parking lot on Pittsburgh's North Shore on Saturday, July 2, 2016, after a concert by Kenny Chesney.
Guy Wathen | Tribune-Review
Piles of trash litter a Heinz Field parking lot on Pittsburgh's North Shore on Saturday, July 2, 2016, after a concert by Kenny Chesney.

While Pittsburgh officials already are planning for a major tailgating mess on the North Shore after the Kenny Chesney show at Heinz Field, the country superstar is coordinating a big cleanup effort of his own.

Chesney hits the road in 2018 for his latest stadium tour, which includes Heinz Field on June 2.

Chesney owns a 10,000-square-foot home in the U.S. Virgin Islands and was among the first in the music field to offer help to his neighbors on St. John, the smallest of the three main Virgin Islands — St. John, St. Croix and St. Thomas — that were hard hit by Hurricane Irma.

He opened his home to 17 people, who rode out the storm in a closet. After the storm Chesney arranged flights aboard his private plane from the islands to Tennessee.

According to Rolling Stone , Chesney is among the country artists who “put their money where their mouths were” when it came time to help those affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

Chesney, Jimmy Buffett and Toby Keith are teaming up for a hurricane relief concert to benefit communities in Florida, Puerto Rico and the Caribbean on Nov. 19 at Florida State University in Tallahassee. Tickets are on sale now.

Within days after Hurricane Irma destroyed Chesney's home on St. John, he started the Kenny Chesney Love for Love City Foundation to help get aid to the Virgin Islands as well as Jost Van Dyke, a small island that is part of the British Virgin Islands.

Flora-Bama owner John McInnis , who teamed with his friend Chesney in the relief effort, has traveled to the Virgin Islands every week since the area was devastated in early September, he told the Tampa Bay Times.

“We've been delivering food, water, generators, medicine, bug spray — all the things they need immediately,'' McInnis told the newspaper. “They have no infrastructure . They're totally dependent on outside supplies and we've been blessed to be able to help supply them since the hurricane.”

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