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Air Force honors North Huntingdon war hero with building dedication

Patrick Varine
| Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2017, 10:00 p.m.
Above, Staff Sgt. David Wieger's parents, Lori and Michael Wieger, stand outside the newly dedicated building at Travis Air Force Base on Nov. 1, 2017.
Photos courtesy of Wieger Memorial Fund Facebook Page
Above, Staff Sgt. David Wieger's parents, Lori and Michael Wieger, stand outside the newly dedicated building at Travis Air Force Base on Nov. 1, 2017.
Air Force Staff Sgt. David Wieger, right, was killed in 2007 in Iraq. Ten years later, to the day, the Air Force dedicated the Office of Special Investigations building at Travis Air Force Base in his memory.
Photos courtesy of Wieger Memorial Fund Facebook Page
Air Force Staff Sgt. David Wieger, right, was killed in 2007 in Iraq. Ten years later, to the day, the Air Force dedicated the Office of Special Investigations building at Travis Air Force Base in his memory.
A plaque honoring the memory of Staff Sgt. David Wieger, killed in action on Nov. 1, 2007, outside Balad, Iraq.
Photos courtesy of Wieger Memorial Fund Facebook Page
A plaque honoring the memory of Staff Sgt. David Wieger, killed in action on Nov. 1, 2007, outside Balad, Iraq.
Memorabilia from Staff Sgt. David Wieger's military career encased at Travis Air Force Base in California.
Photos courtesy of Wieger Memorial Fund Facebook Page
Memorabilia from Staff Sgt. David Wieger's military career encased at Travis Air Force Base in California.
Staff Sgt. David Wieger
submitted
Staff Sgt. David Wieger

Ten years to the day after he died on a reconnaissance mission in Iraq, a North Huntingdon man was honored by Air Force officials in California, who named a building at Travis Air Force Base in his memory.

Staff Sgt. David Wieger gave his life for his country on Nov. 1, 2007, while serving as an Air Force special agent in Balad, Iraq.

The North Huntingdon native and Norwin High School graduate was killed when a roadside bomb struck the Humvee in which he was riding with two other agents as they were returning to their base after an intelligence investigation.

Wieger's brother, Michael Jr., his parents and members of the extended family gathered Wednesday at the base, near Fairfield, Calif., where the Air Force Office of Special Investigations was dedicated in Wieger's memory.

“It's just a great honor,” Michael Wieger Jr. said. “That's the unit he worked in.”

The Air Force OSI provides independent criminal investigative, counterintelligence and protective service operations outside of the traditional military chain of command.

Before entering the Air Force in 1999, Wieger graduated from Westmoreland County Community College with an associate degree in criminology. In 2004, he was recruited into the elite group of special agents in the Air Force Office of Special Investigations.

His objective was to investigate terrorist plots against American soldiers in Iraq and the United States.

Wieger's parents, Lori and Mike, were presented with a Purple Heart and several other medals of honor posthumously.

Shortly after Wieger's death, friends, family and community members organized the Dave Wieger Memorial Fund in his honor. This past summer, fund officials wrapped up their 10th annual golf outing, whose proceeds benefit the Folds of Honor Foundation , which provides educational scholarships to spouses and children of America's fallen and disabled service members.

Next year, Wieger Jr. said, the golf outing will be June 2, and a new addition will be “A Patriot's Concert,” held June 1 at the Foggy Goggle at Seven Springs Mountain Resort in Champion.

He said the Air Force dedication to his brother was very heartwarming.

“It really shows that they're never forgetting him,” he said.

Patrick Varine is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-850-2862, pvarine@tribweb.com or via Twitter @MurrysvilleStar.

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