ShareThis Page
Westmoreland

Westmoreland Community Action demolition firm to hire female heads of household

Renatta Signorini
| Saturday, March 10, 2018, 6:18 p.m.
The American Architectural Salvage shop, in Mt. Pleasant, on Friday, March 9, 2018.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
The American Architectural Salvage shop, in Mt. Pleasant, on Friday, March 9, 2018.
The American Architectural Salvage shop, in Mt. Pleasant, on Friday, March 9, 2018.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
The American Architectural Salvage shop, in Mt. Pleasant, on Friday, March 9, 2018.
The American Architectural Salvage shop, in Mt. Pleasant, on Friday, March 9, 2018.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
The American Architectural Salvage shop, in Mt. Pleasant, on Friday, March 9, 2018.
The American Architectural Salvage shop, in Mt. Pleasant, will be the site of a community paint day for the first Community Arts & Reintegration Project's first mural on April 21.
Dan Speicher | Tribune-Review
The American Architectural Salvage shop, in Mt. Pleasant, will be the site of a community paint day for the first Community Arts & Reintegration Project's first mural on April 21.

A new demolition company focused on hiring 40 female heads of household and others struggling with addiction could start working on projects in the next few months, said Tay Waltenbaugh, director of Westmoreland Community Action.

“We really want to work with that population, help them be employable,” he said.

The organization's retail store, American Architectural Salvage in Mt. Pleasant, was awarded a $780,800 federal grant last year to start a demolition company. The store carries donated building materials and other home items.

With a partner in the demolition company, there will be more control over what types of items are salvaged and directed to the store before a building is torn down, store manager Kenny Czerpak said.

“That will allow us, for the first time, to be able to feed the store on our own,” Czerpak said.

That's everything from sinks to signs and lighting fixtures to lumber from an old barn.

Also, the demolition company will be able to work on an extended time schedule to salvage materials for resale, which will bring more items into the store, said Jack Brown, store general manager and director of community services. There are specialized techniques and tools that demolition company employees can use for those jobs, he said.

“A typical house, when it's deconstructed by hand completely, about 80 percent can be salvaged and resold,” Brown said.

Hiring of a demolition manager is under way. The team will consist of 40 employees who will work mainly in Westmoreland County.

The company will operate the same as other demolition companies, by submitting bid proposals for projects and completing the work.

Czerpak said he will work closely with the demolition manager to evaluate potential projects based on store inventory needs or popular items. Waltenbaugh said 75 percent of people hired for the team will be female heads of household, those struggling with addiction and others who might have difficulty finding jobs. The employees will be trained.

“We're excited to get that up and running,” he said.

Anyone interested in applying can fill out an application in person at Westmoreland Community Action's Greensburg office or online at http://westmorelandca.org/employment-2/ .

Renatta Signorini is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach her at 724-837-5374, rsignorini@tribweb.com or via Twitter @byrenatta.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me