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County signs contract for late tax recovery

INDIANA--At Wednesday morning's special meeting, the Indiana County Commissioners agreed to partner with Statewide Tax Recovery, Inc. of Sunbury, Pa. to help recover delinquent per capita taxes.

"Every year, as tax collectors close their books, there are a certain number of names that are turned over as unpaid for the county as per capita," County Treasurer Sandra Kirkland said.

Kirkland noted there are an average of 10,000 names on the list that the organization receives. "We used to do this ourselves out of our office, but it's quite time consuming," Kirkland said of tax recovery efforts. "It's just easier to use a delinquent collector."

The service does not cost the county anything, but Statewide Inc. will add a fee to the taxpayer for collection.

At their regular meeting last week, the commissioners entered into a cooperation agreement, naming the Redevelopment Authority of Indiana County as their housing agent to administer programs and sign accompanying resolutions.

The agreement will allow the county to execute the 2004 Brownfields for Housing and 2006 HOME Program funds for the White Township Neighborhood Improvement Program.

The program is intends to purchase deteriorated houses, renovate the properties and sell them to families in need.

The commissioners entered into a similar agreement with the Northern Cambria Community Development Corporation to execute the 2006 HOME Program funds for the Chestnut Street Gardens project. The project is an apartment complex that is planned for construction in Indiana Borough.

The commissioners also conveyed a deed from the county to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for the relocation of Geesey Road.

There isn't any monetary consideration for the conveyance of the deed, which was transferred to assist the Jimmy Stewart Airport runway expansion project.

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