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Gallery: Pink Pampering event

| Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012, 8:55 p.m.
Rita Chergi of South Park grabs a handful of beads to give to those attending the fifth annual Pink Pamper event at the Crowne Plaza in Bethel Park Sunday, November 11, 2012. Proceeds will benefit the UPMC Cancer Center Patient Assistance Fund, which helps cancer patients with costs that are not covered by medical insurance. (Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review)
South Park's Shawna Cox and Shaylee Chermer from Hair Enhancements take in the pink and turquoise extensions at the fifth annual Pink Pamper event at the Crowne Plaza in Bethel Park Sunday, November 11, 2012. Proceeds will benefit the UPMC Cancer Center Patient Assistance Fund, which helps cancer patients with costs that are not covered by medical insurance. (Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review)
Jackie Romano gets a manicure from the hands of Nicole Kacerik of South Park at the fifth annual Pink Pamper event at the Crowne Plaza in Bethel Park Sunday, November 11, 2012. Proceeds will benefit the UPMC Cancer Center Patient Assistance Fund, which helps cancer patients with costs that are not covered by medical insurance. (Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review)
Jackie Romano gets a manicure from the hands of Nicole Kacerik of South Park at the fifth annual Pink Pamper event at the Crowne Plaza in Bethel Park Sunday, November 11, 2012. Proceeds will benefit the UPMC Cancer Center Patient Assistance Fund, which helps cancer patients with costs that are not covered by medical insurance. (Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review)
Massage Envy's Diane Krall works on Christine Kaminski of Whitehall at the fifth annual Pink Pamper event at the Crowne Plaza in Bethel Park Sunday, November 11, 2012. Proceeds will benefit the UPMC Cancer Center Patient Assistance Fund, which helps cancer patients with costs that are not covered by medical insurance. (Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review)
Massage Envy's Diane Krall works on Christine Kaminski of Whitehall at the fifth annual Pink Pamper event at the Crowne Plaza in Bethel Park Sunday, November 11, 2012. Proceeds will benefit the UPMC Cancer Center Patient Assistance Fund, which helps cancer patients with costs that are not covered by medical insurance. (Philip G. Pavely | Tribune-Review)

One good pampering deserves another, or so 700 people estimated to have attended the fourth Pink Pampering event Nov. 11 at the Crowne Plaza Pittsburgh South, Bethel Park. Organized by the Pink Pamper Fund Committee, a nonprofit group of about 20 people, the daylong event allows women to have haircuts, manicures, massages and more at reduced cost, with proceeds going to three charities, said Marian Geisler, who cofounded the committee with fellow Bethel Park resident Marsha Davis. Primary beneficiary is the UPMC Cancer Patient Assistance Fund. Patients receive $300 grants to use for treatment-related expenses not covered by insurance. Other organizations that receive Pink Pamper proceeds are the Ladies Hospital Aid Society's Orchid Fund, which buys wigs for cancer patients, and womens shelters in southwestern Pennsylvania. Geisler said while proceeds are still being tallied, about $24,000 had been raised this year, up from about $18,000 last year. Attendees paid a $15 admission fee and $10 to $20 for services, done by professionals who donated all fees and their time to the charity, Geisler said. For more information, go to thepinkpanther.org.

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