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Military news

| Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 9:01 p.m.

Graduating from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas are: Air Force Airman Christopher A. Brophy, son of Donna and James Brophy of Mt. Lebanon and a 2007 graduate of Mt. Lebanon High School; Air National Guard Airman Nicholas T. Calloway, son of Robert Calloway of Sheraden and a 2011 graduate of Northgate High School; and Air Force Airman David A. Ree, son of Barbara Ree of Moon and a 2012 graduate of Moon Area High School.

Returning to the United States after serving in support of Operation Enduring Freedom are: Army Spec. Michael Santoline, an airborne infantryman, son of Jeffrey and Kathy Santoline of Clairton and a 2008 graduate of Clairton High School; Army Staff Sgt. Steven L. Horne Jr., a food service specialist, son of Steven Horne Sr. and Sylvia Clark and a 1990 graduate of Peabody High School; Army Staff Sgt. Eric M. Wisniowski, a cannon crewmember section chief, son of Edward Wisniowski, a 2000 graduate of Perry High School and a 2005 graduate of Everest College, Pittsburgh; Army Spec. Eric Grzegorczyk, a computer detection systems repairer, son of Janet Grzegorczyk and a 1999 graduate of Schenley High School; and Army Sgt. Amber L. Ruble, a heavy equipment mechanic, daughter of Phillip Ruble Sr. of Wilmerding and a 1997 graduate of Plum Senior High School. All are assigned to assigned to the 4th Airborne Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.

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