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Young Achiever: Mira Shenouda

| Wednesday, July 31, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
Young Achiever photo of Mira Shenouda, 15, of Mt. Lebanon.

Age: 15

Family: Mother, Susan Iannuzzi, and father, Emil Shenouda

School: Mira will be a junior at Mt. Lebanon High School.

Hobbies/Activities: Mira is active in Girl Scouting and the GirlGov program sponsored by the Women and Girls Foundation. She volunteers at Asbury Heights' assisted living unit, Asbury Villas. She is a member of student council and throws javelin for the girls' track team. Mira traded her flute as part of the Blue Devils marching band to become a member of the Rockettes. She is a member of the French and Arab clubs at school.

Noteworthy: Mira has been selected to serve as a junior commissioner during the upcoming fall semester. Working with Mt. Lebanon elected officials and municipal staff, a junior commissioner helps convey students' concerns and opinions and educate fellow students about issues facing the community.

Mira said her interest in government started with the contrast of free speech in the United States, including the community debate over Mt. Lebanon High School renovations, and the revolution in Egypt — where she attended third grade in Cairo and where many of her father's relatives live.

Quote: “I saw the events in Egypt unravel right before my eyes and saw what was happening to my friends and relatives there. It made me want to have more of a role in what is happening in my own community. I want to make a difference by playing a role in my local government.”

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