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Coping with Kids: Soft Toy sales help needy kids get education

| Monday, Nov. 12, 2012, 8:53 p.m.
The Huggalo doll lines includes a special “Brave Little Trooper” doll for military families with someone deployed. Huggalo
The Huggalo doll is designed to remind kids that they are loved by the people who can’t be with them. Huggalo
The IKEA Soft Toys for Education Campaign, running through Dec. 29, aims to help needy children get an education. For every soft toy that IKEA sells, the company will donate one Euro (worth $1.30) to UNICEF and Save the Children. Soft toys cost up to $19.99. Ikea
The IKEA Soft Toys for Education Campaign, running through Dec. 29, aims to help needy children get an education. For every soft toy that IKEA sells, the company will donate one Euro (worth $1.30) to UNICEF and Save the Children. Soft toys cost up to $19.99. Ikea
The IKEA Soft Toys for Education Campaign, running through Dec. 29, aims to help needy children get an education. For every soft toy that IKEA sells, the company will donate one Euro (worth $1.30) to UNICEF and Save the Children. Soft toys cost up to $19.99. Ikea
The IKEA Soft Toys for Education Campaign, running through Dec. 29, aims to help needy children get an education. For every soft toy that IKEA sells, the company will donate one Euro (worth $1.30) to UNICEF and Save the Children. Soft toys cost up to $19.99. Ikea

Soft Toy sales help needy kids get education

The IKEA Soft Toys for Education Campaign, running through Dec. 29, aims to help needy children get an education. For every soft toy that IKEA sells, the company will donate one Euro (worth $1.30) to UNICEF and Save the Children. Soft toys available include Mr. Broccoli and Clown Dog, and cost up to $19.99.

Since the Soft Toys for Education program began in 2003, IKEA has raised more than $61 million to help more than 8 million kids in almost 40 countries.

Details: www.ikea.com

Huggalo dolls carry message of love

If your child misses a special someone during the holidays, a Huggalo might help. Huggalo dolls have clear frames on their tummy to hold special pictures or love notes. The Huggalo doll is designed to remind kids that they are loved by the people who can't be with them. The Huggalo doll lines includes a special “Brave Little Trooper” doll for military families who have someone deployed.

For every Huggalo doll sold for the rest of 2012, the manufacturer will donate one doll to a military family. The dolls come in many styles and cost $19.95 to $24.95.

Details: www.huggalo.com

Want to quit smoking? Penn State has tips

If you smoke and want to live longer, think about quitting on Nov. 15, which is the annual Great American Smoke Out.

The Penn State Cooperative Extension in Greensburg is offering free tips and support for aspiring quitters.It suggests until you quit smoking, begin to protect the health of your children and other nonsmokers in your family by stepping outside to smoke. Details: 888-664-2248

Poll: Parents want to eat more often with family

In an Olive Garden poll of Pittsburgh-area parents, 97 percent said they feel closer to their family when they share a meal together. Of the parents polled, 83 percent said they would like to eat together as a family more than four nights per week, but only 47 percent of people actually do this.

Of the Pittsburgh parents polled, 19 percent said they eat with their families every night, compared to 25 percent nationally. About one-fifth of local parents said they eat together two or fewer nights a week. When they do prepare dinner, 65 percent of parents said they spent 31 minutes or more cooking; and 37 percent of parents said they are more likely to buy fast food for their families after a stressful day.

Olive Garden To Go is offering Weeknight Family-Style Meal Deals through Dec. 2, on Sundays through Thursdays after 4 p.m.

Details: www.olivegarden.com

— Staff and wire reports

Send parenting news to Coping With Kids in care of Rebecca Killian, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, D.L. Clark Building, 503 Martindale St., Pittsburgh, PA 15212, or e-mail rkillian@tribweb.com.

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