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health briefs

By Valley News Dispatch
Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012, 8:57 p.m.
 

AVH expands treatment of liver disease

Allegheny Valley Hospital is expanding its liver-disease capabilities under the direction of Dr. Ngoc Thai, a nationally recognized liver surgeon and transplantation specialist.

The new AVH Liver Center is an extension of the Liver Center at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh. There will be a liver-disease clinic for patients twice a month at AVH, and patient treatment will be managed at the local hospital or at Allegheny General Hospital.

For more information, call the liver center at 412-359-6738.

Nutrition coaching through Highmark

Allegheny Valley Hospital's Destination Wellness at Pittsburgh Mills, Frazer, offers Highmark Personal Nutrition Coaching.

This one-on-one counseling session is facilitated by a registered dietitian and is designed to address the nutritional changes needed to manage heart disease, diabetes, weight management and other health-related issues.

Sessions are by appointment only. There is no fee for Highmark members; a nominal fee for non-Highmark members. Call 724-274-5202 for an appointment or details.

— Staff reports

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