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Water warning in effect in parts of Armstrong County

Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - Residents of the Balcony Towers apartments in Kittanning line up to fill jugs with water from a water buffalo set up at the Kittanning Municipal Building on South McKean Street on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012. Pennsylvania American Water on Friday warned about 6,000 residents in Kittanning, Applewold and parts of Manor and Rayburn to avoid using their water because it may have been tainted by high pH levels.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Residents of the Balcony Towers apartments in Kittanning line up to fill jugs with water from a water buffalo set up at the Kittanning Municipal Building on South McKean Street on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012. Pennsylvania American Water on Friday warned about 6,000 residents in Kittanning, Applewold and parts of Manor and Rayburn to avoid using their water because it may have been tainted by high pH levels.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - Cases and gallon jugs of water sold out at Sprankles Market in Kittanning by 1 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, after Pennsylvania American Water announced Kittanning-area customers should not use the water due to concerns of high pH at the treatment plant. Sprankles only had flavored water and tonic water left on the shelves.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Cases and gallon jugs of water sold out at Sprankles Market in Kittanning by 1 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, after Pennsylvania American Water announced Kittanning-area customers should not use the water due to concerns of high pH at the treatment plant.  Sprankles only had flavored water and tonic water left on the shelves.
Erica Hilliard | Valley News Dispatch - Kevin Andrews, left, a tourism assistant for the Armstrong County Tourist Bureau, and Andrew Laddusaw, a board member for Downtown Kittanning Inc., take down letters advertising Kittanning's Light-Up Night that was cancelled on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, after the borough declared a state of emergency due to water restrictions.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Erica Hilliard  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Kevin Andrews, left, a tourism assistant for the Armstrong County Tourist Bureau, and Andrew Laddusaw, a board member for Downtown Kittanning Inc., take down letters advertising Kittanning's Light-Up Night that was cancelled on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, after the borough declared a state of emergency due to water restrictions.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - John Brown, a resident of the Balcony Towers apartments in Kittanning, assists fellow resident Dorothy Wynkoop by filling jugs for her from a water buffalo set up at the Kittanning Municipal Building on South McKean Street on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>John Brown, a resident of the Balcony Towers apartments in Kittanning, assists fellow resident Dorothy Wynkoop by filling jugs for her from a water buffalo set up at the Kittanning Municipal Building on South McKean Street on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - Workers gather around portable water buffaloes at the Applewold volunteer fire station on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Workers gather around portable water buffaloes at the Applewold volunteer fire station on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - East Franklin Fire Chief Mark Feeney, the emergency management coordinator for Applewold, fills a jug from a water buffalo set up at the Applewold fire station on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>East Franklin Fire Chief Mark Feeney, the emergency management coordinator for Applewold, fills a jug from a water buffalo set up at the Applewold fire station on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - East Franklin Fire Chief Mark Feeney, the emergency management coordinator for Applewold, fills a jug from a water buffalo set up at the Applewold fire station on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>East Franklin Fire Chief Mark Feeney, the emergency management coordinator for Applewold, fills a jug from a water buffalo set up at the Applewold fire station on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012.
Erica Hilliard | Valley News Dispatch - Workers make phone calls at the Kittanning water treatment facility in Rayburn on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012. Pennsylvania American Water on Friday warned about 6,000 residents in Kittanning, Applewold and parts of Manor and Rayburn to avoid using their water because it may have been tainted by high pH levels.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Erica Hilliard  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Workers make phone calls at the Kittanning water treatment facility in Rayburn on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012. Pennsylvania American Water on Friday warned about 6,000 residents in Kittanning, Applewold and parts of Manor and Rayburn to avoid using their water because it may have been tainted by high pH levels.
Erica Hilliard | Valley News Dispatch - Workers make phone calls at the Kittanning water treatment facility in Rayburn on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012. Pennsylvania American Water on Friday warned about 6,000 residents in Kittanning, Applewold and parts of Manor and Rayburn to avoid using their water because it may have been tainted by high pH levels.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Erica Hilliard  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Workers make phone calls at the Kittanning water treatment facility in Rayburn on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012.  Pennsylvania American Water on Friday warned about 6,000 residents in Kittanning, Applewold and parts of Manor and Rayburn to avoid using their water because it may have been tainted by high pH levels.
Erica Hilliard | Valley News Dispatch - Andrew Laddusaw, left, a board member for Downtown Kittanning Inc., and Kevin Andrews, a tourism assistant for the Armstrong County Tourist Bureau, take down letters advertising Kittanning's Light-Up Night that was cancelled on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, after a state of emergency was declared in the borough due to water restrictions.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Erica Hilliard  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Andrew Laddusaw, left, a board member for Downtown Kittanning Inc., and  Kevin Andrews, a tourism assistant for the Armstrong County Tourist Bureau, take down letters advertising Kittanning's Light-Up Night that was cancelled on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, after a state of emergency was declared in the borough due to water restrictions.
Erica Hilliard | Valley News Dispatch - Workers make phone calls at the Kittanning water treatment facility in Rayburn on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012. Pennsylvania American Water on Friday warned about 6,000 residents in Kittanning, Applewold and parts of Manor and Rayburn to avoid using their water because it may have been tainted by high pH levels.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Erica Hilliard  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Workers make phone calls at the Kittanning water treatment facility in Rayburn on Friday, Nov. 16, 2012. Pennsylvania American Water on Friday warned about 6,000 residents in Kittanning, Applewold and parts of Manor and Rayburn to avoid using their water because it may have been tainted by high pH levels.

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By Brigid Beatty, Liz Hayes and Jodi Weigand
Friday, Nov. 16, 2012, 12:30 p.m.
 

Pennsylvania American Water lifted its ban on water usage Friday evening for 2,100 residents of Kittanning, Applewold and portions of Manor and Rayburn.

However, the company has issued an advisory for residents to boil their water only for drinking until further notice.

The water company issued the first alert Friday around 11 a.m. urging residents not to use water from its Rayburn plant for drinking, bathing, hand-washing, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, cooking or food preparation until further notice.

Then, Friday evening, the water company lifted the ban and advised residents to boil their water for at least a minute before using it for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth and food preparation until further notice.

Residents are also urged to drain and refill their water heater; flush hot and cold water systems for at least five minutes, and discard any items made with the water after 5 a.m. Friday.

The water advisory could stay in effect for the next 24 to 36 hours, according to Gary Lobaugh, spokesman for Pennsylvania American Water.

Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection spokesman John Poister said initial indications are Penn American used too much caustic soda, a chemical used in treating water, but the DEP had not yet been informed of how that happened. Poister said the company reported the affected water appears to have been contained at the treatment plant and didn't get distributed through the lines.

“They were able to divert the (tainted) water into a clear well, what I would call a holding tank, and they've pumped regular water around that and they were able to isolate it,” Poister said.

“They suspected that some of this high pH water may have gone to an area known as Troy Hill (in Rayburn), but they've taken some readings there and it appears OK,” Poister said.

In a press release, Lobaugh said that because of the shutdown, a loss of positive water pressure could cause contamination to enter the water distribution system. Given those risks, the water company issued the advisory for residents to boil their water.

The company is collecting and analyzing additional water quality samples.

Randy Brozenick, director of Armstrong County Emergency Management, said he is not yet certain what caused the problem with the pH: “We can't seem to get a clear answer” from Pennsylvania American.

Armstrong County county set up water buffaloes at the Armstrong County Health Center, 265 South McKean St., Kittanning; the Applewold Volunteer Fire Department, 300 Ridge Ave.; and Kittanning Hose Co. 6, 1360 Orr Ave.

Kittanning declared a state of emergency and cancelled Friday's holiday parade.

Lobaugh said in a release that sample results received on Friday showed higher than normal levels of pH that exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's health advisory level of 10.

Kait Gillis, a spokeswoman for the Pennsylvania Department of Health, said there have been no reports of people being sickened by the tainted water.

She said anyone drinking water with elevated pH would immediately experience a burning sensation in the mouth and throat, likely preventing further consumption.

“It's a temporary discomfort and would not cause permanent damage,” she said.

Poister said an estimated 6,000 residents are impacted. In Manor, only the Typewriter Hill neighborhood was affected.

Customers in the affected areas will experience low water pressure and fire hydrants will not have water until the problem is resolved.

Once service is restored, Brozenick said it could take four days for the water to begin running as normal. Customers might have very low pressure, but would still have water, he said.

Brigid Beatty, Liz Hayes and Jodi Weigand are staff writers for Trib Total Media. Beatty can be reached at 724-543-1303 or bbeatty@tribweb.com. Hayes can be reached at 724-226-4680 or lhayes@tribweb.com. Weigand can be reached at 724-226-4702 or jweigand@tribweb.com.

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