Share This Page

Sheetz may buy old Heights Elementary School for $1M

| Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, 1:11 a.m.

The old Heights Elementary School might be replaced by a Sheetz Convenience Store sometime next year.

Highlands School Board agreed to hold a vote at its Oct. 15 meeting on authorizing Solicitor Ira Weiss and Business Manager Jon Rupert to negotiate a $1 million purchase agreement with RBG Development Group of Pittsburgh.

On Monday night, Weiss said RBG Development, which expressed interest in the Heights building in September, is acting as the agent for Altoona-based Sheetz.

The board discussed the status of Heights and of the former administrative center along 11th Avenue. Both buildings are in Harrison and have been closed by the school board, which is trying to sell the properties.

Weiss said that Sheetz's interest in the property is contingent upon getting the proper approvals and permits. That includes a change to commercial zoning for the 2.34-acre site, which sits in an R-1 residential zone.

While he said the Harrison Commissioners haven't taken any action on the property, Weiss said, “The township has given indications that they support the development there.”

“The price, which is $1 million, is substantially more than we could get on the open market,” Weiss said.

However, there will be restrictions on how the district can spend the money, he said.

“They have to use the money for debt service or capital projects,” Weiss said. “That's a requirement of the school code.”

The site will remain in a school zone, as Highlands Middle School sits across Freeport Road from it.

That could raise some safety concerns since Sheetz stores, which include multiple gasoline pumps, attract a lot of traffic.

Weiss said those concerns would have to be worked out through the permit approval process with the township and the school district.

Lisa Colautti, Weiss' associate, said RBG is no stranger to this type of situation.

“They have done developments with other school districts, so they know the state school code,” she said.

Weiss said a negotiated sale of school property has to be approved by the Allegheny County Courts, which will require a hearing, in addition to the process for getting the zoning and permit approvals through the township.

Asked how long it might take before the path is cleared for a deal, Weiss said, “I would say at least nine months.”

As for the former administrative center, the board has decided to sell by working through a Realtor. That decision was made because the district advertised the building for sale but received no bids.

The board instructed Rupert to get proposals from three Realtors and bring them back to the board for a decision.

Tom Yerace is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at (724) 226-4675 or tyerace@tribweb.com.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.