TribLIVE

| Neighborhoods

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Artist Dan Bolick gets personal at Penn State New Ken

Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - Dan Bolick's portrait of Iphiyenia at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Dan Bolick's portrait of Iphiyenia at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - Dan Bolick's portrait of Clyde Charles at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Dan Bolick's portrait of Clyde Charles at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - Dan Bolick's portrait of his daughter at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013. 'This portrait is an assemblage made from plywood and acrylic paint of my daughter Sabrina. It is made up of about 220 or so small pieces of plywood each with a different design or pattern,' says Bolick.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>  Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Dan Bolick's portrait of his daughter at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013. 'This portrait is an assemblage made from plywood and acrylic paint of my daughter Sabrina.  It is made up of about 220 or so small pieces of plywood each with a different design or pattern,' says Bolick.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - Dan Bolick's self-portrait at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Dan Bolick's self-portrait at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - Dan Bolick's artwork titled 'Fred Kisses the Shaman's Rattle' at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Dan Bolick's artwork titled 'Fred Kisses the Shaman's Rattle' at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - Dan Bolick's portrait of Nancy Smith at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013. Smith, from Lorain, Ohio, was sentenced to 30 to 90 years imprisonment for sexually abusing young children — a crime she did not commit. Smith was exonerated after 15 years.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>   Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Dan Bolick's portrait of Nancy Smith at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013.  Smith, from Lorain, Ohio, was sentenced to 30 to 90 years imprisonment for sexually abusing young children —  a crime she did not commit.  Smith was exonerated after 15 years.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - Dan Bolick's work titled Elias at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013, is a portrait of his son Eli. It's an assemblage made of plywood, acrylic paint and collaged pieces of maps and billboard paper.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>   Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Dan Bolick's work titled Elias at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013, is a portrait of his son Eli.  It's an assemblage made of plywood, acrylic paint and collaged pieces of maps and billboard paper.
Jason Bridge | Valley News Dispatch - Dan Bolick's artwork titled 'Arson' at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em> Jason Bridge  |  Valley News Dispatch</em></div>Dan Bolick's artwork titled 'Arson' at the Penn State New Kensington art gallery on Wednesday, January 16, 2013.
Dan Bolick - Dan Bolick's portrait of Clarence Elkins who was sentenced to life imprisonment for a rape and murder he did not commit. The New Lexington, Ohio, man was exonerated after 7 years. Dan Bolick
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Dan Bolick</em></div>Dan Bolick's portrait of Clarence Elkins who was sentenced to life imprisonment for a rape and murder he did not commit. The New Lexington, Ohio, man was exonerated after 7 years. Dan Bolick
Dan Bolick - Dan Bolick's portrait titled 'John Thompson and the Judge.' ' In it I have included the actual words of the judge as he sentenced John to death' Bolick says. Exoneree Thompson is from New Orleans. Dan Bolick
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Dan Bolick</em></div>Dan Bolick's portrait titled 'John Thompson and the Judge.' ' In it I have included the actual words of the judge as he sentenced John to death' Bolick says.  Exoneree Thompson is from New Orleans.   Dan Bolick
Dan Bolick - A portrait of Dan Bolick Submitted by Dan Bolick
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Dan Bolick</em></div>A portrait of Dan Bolick Submitted by Dan Bolick
Dan Bolick - Dan Bolick's painting titled 'Angry Youth' says it all. “He is an ex-student of mine. His anger is well justified and I would prefer he remain anonymous,” Dan Bolick. Dan Bolick
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Dan Bolick</em></div>Dan Bolick's painting titled 'Angry Youth' says it all.  “He is an ex-student of mine.  His anger is well justified and I would prefer he remain anonymous,” Dan Bolick. Dan Bolick

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

‘In Your Face'

What: Exhibit by artist Dan Bolick

When: Through Feb. 28. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Mondays-Fridays; noon-5 p.m. weekends

Admission: Free

Where: Penn State, New Kensington, Route 780, Upper Burrell

Details: 724-334-6004; www.danielbolick.com

Daily Photo Galleries

AlleKiski Valley Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2013, 9:01 p.m.
 

When he paints a portrait of someone, Murrysville artist Dan Bolick says he is, in a sense, switching places with them.

The true subject of each portrait is the interchange that takes place with the person depicted, he says. “I am painting them, but I am also trying to paint what I know about them. Hopefully, this is reflected in the outcome of the painting.”

After debuting in 2010 at Penn State New Kensington with “Resurrected” — his touring portraits of 10 wrongly convicted men who were freed after years of sitting on death row or facing life sentences — Bolick returns to the gallery with “In Your Face.”

“This year, people will see 35 faces looking back at them. Each portrait has a story behind it,” he says. “All of the people behind the faces have made an impact on me in one way or another.”

The exhibit, now showing and continuing through Feb. 28, offers 21 expressionistic-style works, made with acrylic, spray and latex house paint; nine portraits that are three-dimensional collage/assemblages created with plywood, acrylic paint and old maps and billboard paper; and five portraits rendered with ball-point pen, magic marker and colored pencil.

A meet-the-artist gathering is scheduled for noon Feb. 6 in the gallery.

“Dan has strong, socially relevant work. I admire and respect what he does, how it connects to his life and to the larger community,” says Bud Gibbons, Penn State professor of art and gallery director.

“The power that these paintings have on the gallery walls is matched visually by the powerful message explicit in the work,” Gibbons says. “People are struck by the paintings and pulled into their stories by the writing that is part of some of these images.”

When singer-songwriter Sting saw the artist's touring “Resurrected” exhibit in New York City, he told Bolick, “I love your drips, man,” referring to the flow of paint and how it creates emotion.

“The reactions I have received from people who have seen the ‘Resurrected' exhibit has always been very, very positive,” Bolick says. “People everywhere are very concerned and vocal about the issue of wrongful incarceration.”

When he saw the paintings at Point Park University in 2010, at a fundraiser for the university's now-defunct Innocence Institute, famed author John Grisham promised to help him find a larger audience for the exhibit, even writing a recommendation for his application for a Guggenheim Fellowship. (Bolick was not awarded the fellowship, monies from which he had hoped to use to continue to meet new exonerees and expand the project, offer free shipment of the exhibit and to write a book based on it. “As of now, the project has no legs. I have zero funding,” he says.)

Five paintings and five drawings from “Resurrected” are in the “In Your Face” show, including two new exonerees. They fit the theme of “In Your Face,” the artist suggests, because they “in and of themselves” also are faces.

“The artwork in the gallery is in the form of very energetic paintings representing in every case, ‘Faces,' the title,” says Gibbons. “The title is perfect as a description of excellent, powerful, well-painted images that capture your attention and tell a story.”

The portraits in the gallery are designed “to look at you while you are looking at them,” Bolick says.

He says none of the people in the exhibit are well known, except for the collages of Gandhi and Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata. With the exception of the “Arson” and “Burglary” portraits, he knows all of the subjects.

The back wall is made up of seven portraits of his immediate family, who he says are his “muses.” The right wall features memorable students from his 34-year teaching career in Pittsburgh Public Schools, from which he is retired. “There is a story for each one,” he says.

The left wall holds his portraits from “Resurrected. “In the corner of the front wall are four small collage-paint portraits of people I know, just regular folks,” he says.

Bolick says he hopes that those who view his work in this exhibit slow down and contemplate on the visual image.

“I want them to look into the person I have depicted,” he says. “What emotions do they feel emanating from the person behind the paint? I also want the viewer to look at the surface of the painting and ask themselves, ‘How is it made, why do the colors run, does how the paint is applied to the surface conjure any feelings, does the paint cry?'”

He continues to say he is not interested in painting “pretty pictures.” “I'm more interested in creating a more socially responsible art,” he says. “I try to think of myself and my exoneree portraits as a form of art activism,” he explains. “I'm trying to act as the conscience of the people, trying to give a visual voice to this problem and, at the same time, help some people.”

Rex Rutkoski is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-226-4664 or rrutkoski@tribweb.com.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read AlleKiski Valley

  1. Armstrong inmate escapee charged with murdering family matriarch
  2. New Kensington-Arnold committee discusses ways to combat bullying
  3. Captured Armstrong jail escapee Crissman’s criminal history
  4. Winfield supervisors OK natural gas-drilling regulations
  5. Mt. St. Peter draws crowds with 34th annual Festa Italiana in New Kensington
  6. South Butler superintendent heads home for Mohawk job
  7. ATI reveals details of contract offer to steelworkers union
  8. ‘Wax weed’ worries authorities
  9. Valley flocks to welcome new Greensburg bishop
  10. Freeport to address sewage bill deadbeats
  11. USW rallies in support of ATI, other steel companies’ employees