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Vandergrift stormwater/sewage separation project gets 3-month extension

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By George Guido
Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013, 12:06 a.m.
 

Vandergrift Council granted a three-month extension on Monday night to the company working on the stormwater/sewage separation project.

Monzo Corp. of Latrobe was scheduled to complete the project, which involves 350 residential units, in April. The restoration and repaving has been slower than expected.

“They have run into unforeseeable obstacles and have the need to do additional work,” said Michael Bove of Bove engineering.

The extension is permissible under terms of the PennVEST grant, which funds the $3.3 million project.

The state has approved a traffic-control plan for the Holland Avenue section of the project.

The detours will begin on March 4, when two blocks of Holland will be closed.

Bove said Holland, a state road, has weak soil underneath. When trenches are dug for new sewer pipes, Bove feels, the trenches could collapse if one lane of the street is open to traffic.

Motorists entering Vandergrift from the community pool area will be detoured by way of Lowell Street to Wallace, then to Walnut and to Oak.

Those heading out of the borough will be detoured from Wallace to Lowell.

Council members also said on Monday night that four Irving Street homes that have a septic system will get free tap-ins to the new sewer lines. Property owners, however, will have to pay for the lines from the homes to the tap-in area.

Phase II of the stormwater/sewage separation project also is moving ahead.

This will be the largest of the three phases, It will involve 1,200 units and will cost about $10.9 million.

Plans were submitted to the state Department of Environmental Protection On Jan. 25.

Once DEP approval is received, Vandergrift can pursue additional PennVEST funding.

In other business

• Council didn't discuss the proposed Ion, GX Technology Inc. project.

Ion would like to test for possible underground shale formations beneath the borough.

Council turned down a request by Ion late last year to conduct seismic testing.

Borough Solicitor Larry Loperfito reportedly met with Ion officials last month regarding the dispute.

Vandergrift is part of a 281 square mile testing area, based mostly in neighboring Armstrong County.

• The borough could update the 2004 residential rental ordinance.

The ordinance calls for an apartment owner who lives more than 25 air miles from Vandergrift to hire a site manager from the borough area.

A proposal could reduce the distance to 15 air miles.

Last year's disruptive tenant ordinance could be consolidated with the 15-mile requirement in a new ordinance that is expected to be reviewed by council on March 4.

George Guido is a freelance writer for Trib Total Media.

 

 
 


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