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Park it somewhere else, Brackenridge tells mill construction workers

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Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, 1:31 a.m.
 

Some people working on the construction of ATI-Allegheny Ludlum's mill are finding parking in Brackenridge pricey.

That's because police have been writing $25 parking tickets for vehicles parked along the street that don't have a resident's parking permit.

Police Chief Jamie Bock told council Thursday night that has been picking up lately.

“Officer (Pat) Ford ticketed 40-some cars the other day, and I ticketed 10 today,” Bock said.

Bock said most of the violations have been occurring on Third, Sixth, Stieren and Nelson avenues from Morgan Street to the mill.

Borough officials are standing behind the crackdown.

“I think we should because we've got two more years of this,” Councilman Tim Connelly said.

Bock suggested trying to alleviate the situation by posting signs that say “Resident Parking Only.”

Council will look at whether the borough bought such signs in the past or had them made by borough workers.

“The mill and every contractor has told the employees not to park on the street, that they have sufficient parking for them,” Mayor Tom Kish said.

That parking is in ATI lots, particularly a large one along Third Avenue.

“People are not parking efficiently and (ATI) said because of that, they're losing 30 percent of their parking,” Kish said. “People are taking up too much space when they park.”

The resulting overflow onto the streets is not making life any easier for residents living along those streets.

“They have nowhere to park when they come home from work,” Bock said.

“I think we have to do whatever we can to help (the residents),” Kish said.

For now at least, that means making the parking violators pay. The tickets being issued carry a $25 fine, according to Bock.

“We don't want to break anybody, but we don't want to give them a slap on the wrist, either,” he said.

Bock said it was not a big problem in the past but he thinks because the construction work on the $1.1 billion hot strip mill is picking up, more construction workers are coming into town.

“Here and there, we had a problem before,” Bock said. “but it's picked up lately with all these new people coming in.”

Tom Yerace is a staff writer for Trib Total Media.

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