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New Kensington bank robbery suspect nabbed within minutes

| Wednesday, May 8, 2013, 12:53 a.m.
Anthony J. Hughley, 23, of Victoria Avenue, New Kensington was apprehended about seven minutes after allegedly robbing the First Niagara Bank in New Kensington’s Parnassus neighborhood on Tuesday, May 7, 2013.Photo courtesy of New Kensington Police Department

Police say a New Kensington bank robber had new cash for less than 10 minutes before he was arrested Tuesday.

They credit the quick collar on information supplied by the public.

Anthony J. Hughley, 23, of Victoria Avenue was apprehended about seven minutes after allegedly robbing the First Niagara Bank in New Kensington's Parnassus neighborhood, according to police Detective Sgt. Dino DiGiacobbe.

Hughley was unarmed and no one was injured.

“We were able to apprehend him because of assistance from citizens,” DiGiacobbe said. “We want to thank them.”

He said Hughley, who was already on probation, is facing a single count of robbery.

Police said Hughley was wearing a scarf covering his face, a hooded sweatshirt and blue jeans when he walked into the bank at 333 Freeport St., handed a clerk a nylon bag and told the clerk to fill it up.

The robbery took place at 2:53 p.m.; Hughley was arrested along the 400 block of Fourth Avenue about 3 p.m.

Police said citizens saw Hughley run from the bank.

Neighbors also saw him duck into a yard to change out of clothing he wore into the bank, DiGiacobbe said.“We got a good description from the bank and citizens called us to say where he was running,” the detective said. “Some told us they saw him change his clothing and where he was heading.”

Hughley didn't resist when New Kensington and Arnold police converged on Fourth Avenue, police said.DiGiacobbe said Officer Kevin Hess handcuffed and searched Hughley. The man had the nylon bag described by a teller and money from the bank.

“We have recovered all of the money,” the detective said. He declined to say how much was in the bag.

“We specifically want to thank the citizens of Parnassus,” DiGiacobbe said. “There were a lot of people out and they called.”

By 5 p.m., Hughley was in the police holding cell awaiting a trip to a district judge for arraignment.

He was placed on probation in Westmoreland County earlier this year for having drug paraphernalia.

It was the second time the bank branch had been robbed since February.

Anthony R. Scratchard, 40, was arrested two days later in Tarentum.He is in the Westmoreland County jail in lieu of bond pending a plea bargain slated this month.

Chuck Biedka is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-226-4711 or cbiedka@tribweb.com.

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