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Freeport Area to report on school safety and security this month

| Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, 1:26 a.m.

Freeport Area School District hopes to have a report on school safety and security this month.

Superintendent Christopher DeVivo said on Wednesday night that he had hoped to have a report ready by late September, but findings are being delayed by the possibility that money could be available to help implement programs.

Officials did not specify the possible source.

School board member Mark Shoaf suggested that the school district adopt measures similar to what's being employed in Texas and New Jersey, where teachers are trained to recognize students with mental health issues and intervention could take place.

Shoaf will talk to state officials in Harrisburg to see whether Pennsylvania can adopt proactive positions on the issue.

“Maybe we could make this part of teachers' in-service training and help them to even recognize students who might be suicidal,” Shoaf said. “I hope our administration takes this into account.”

School board President Daniel Lucovich said a “ton of ideas are coming in daily” and a safety committee may be appointed soon.

In other business

• The school board hired Stacey Straub as a teacher, effective Oct. 23, with a starting salary of $35,000 a year, prorated for days she works during the 2013-14 year.

She will teach biology when she starts on Oct. 23.

• The school district looks to use teacher David DiSanti's classes as a pilot program for students to bring their own technology devices in as classroom aides.

Officials said the district declined to make it a districtwide pilot program, citing what they said were other districts' negative experiences with large bring-your-own-device programs.

George Guido is a freelance writer for Trib Total Media.

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