Share This Page

Washington Township police offered new contract

| Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, 12:21 a.m.

Washington Township police officers should soon have a new four-year contract retroactive to Jan. 1.

Supervisors on Thursday night approved the pact that calls for a 2.75 percent wage increase the first year and a 3 percent raise in each of the final three years.

Supervisors said base-wage figures won't be available until the police department signs off on the deal.

When the township and the Fraternal Order of Police, the police department's bargaining unit, couldn't come to an agreement, the matter was handed over to an arbitrator.

Retroactive wages dating to Jan. 1 will be paid by Oct. 31, according to officials.

The department has 12 officers patrolling the 31-square-mile township.

In other business

• Bryan Chambers was given approval to build a 60-by-100-foot building to house his plumbing business at 4084 Route 66.

Chambers will have four employees.

It will not be a retail building that the public would visit. Instead, Chambers will send his employees to daily work sites.

Chambers will open the business once stormwater-maintenance issues are addressed.

• The Municipal Authority of Washington Township will expand its Camp Nancy pump station.

Supervisors approved the authority's purchase of 1,100 square feet of property from the Gregory Ambrose family at 772 Route 380. A purchase price was not available on Thursday.

• The Pugtoberfest, a fundraiser for the rescue of pug dogs, is planned from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at Kunkle Park.

Additional information is available at www.swpapug.org.

• The township's trick-or-treat night will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Oct. 31.

Also, the Lions Club will sponsor a Halloween parade at Kunkle Park at 6 p.m. Oct. 26 with a star-gazing party to follow at sunset.

George Guido is a freelance writer for Trib Total Media.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.