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Oberg Industries looking to expand operation in Buffalo Township

| Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, 12:41 a.m.

Oberg Industries is looking to expand its operation in Buffalo Township.

Facilities Manager Dan Felack told the township supervisors on Wednesday night that the company would like to build a 65,000-square-foot addition either at its Silverville Road campus or the South Pike campus along Route 356, also in Buffalo Township.

The longtime precision component and tool-and-die manufacturer has hired more than 100 people over the past two years and has 40 to 50 openings, Felack said.

“We are literally out of space,” Felack said. “We're looking for a short-term answer for a long-term solution.”

Oberg Industries would like to have a portion of Oberg Drive vacated and closed. The street runs from Silverville Road between two of Oberg's buildings and intersects with Short Street.

Felack said safety is the main issue. Employees and customers often cross over Oberg Drive and motorists passing through have created a safety hazard.

Oberg would have to buy the land from the township, officials said.

Neighbors would have access to Silverville Road by way of two other streets should Oberg Drive be closed.

Solicitor Larry Lutz said an ordinance to vacate the road “is in the works.”

Felack left a site plan with supervisors detailing what the company would like to do.

Zoning change considered

Supervisors are considering changing an area along Old Route 28 (Freeport Road) and Route 356 (South Pike Road) from agricultural to commercial.

Harrison developer Brian Clark is looking to develop an area around the former Dugout Tavern where the redesigned Freeport Bridge meets Freeport Road.

Another option might be to allow Clark or any other developer to put in a commercial business in a specific area where pre-existing businesses are located.

Supervisors, however, favored a zoning change to cover the entire corridor.

Other developers have inquired about the entire corridor from the Harrison boundary to Route 356, heading toward the Allegheny Valley Expressway, officials said.

To change the zoning district, a public hearing would have to be scheduled, and the types of commercial businesses, including billboards, that would be permitted, what setbacks lines would be and what mine subsidence issues must be visited.

George Guido is a freelance writer for Trib Total Media.

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