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Apollo-Ridge partners with more schools for college credits

| Wednesday, March 26, 2014, 7:28 a.m.

Apollo-Ridge High School students will have more opportunities next year to get an early jump on their college careers without having to leave the building.

The board on Monday came to agreements with Mount Aloysius College and Pennsylvania Highlands Community College to offer credit for approved Advanced Placement courses at Apollo-Ridge.

Each three-credit course will be offered only to 11th- and 12th-graders, who will pay between $35 and $50 for each credit.

“This is a chance for the kids to get a jump start at a very inexpensive rate,” board president Greg Primm said.

The district will first submit syllabi for its advanced English, biology, chemistry and business courses for the colleges' approval, according to Superintendent Matt Curci.

Those are the courses that have been approved by Seton Hill University and Indiana University of Pennsylvania, with which Apollo-Ridge has dual-enrollment agreements.

Students whose classes apply both to the high school and IUP are required to attend courses at the Indiana campus to receive credit.

Like Seton Hill, Mount Aloysius in Cresson and Pennsylvania Highlands, with multiple campuses, will offer credit for courses taught at the high school.

How the credits transfer will vary based on individual institutions, according to Curci.

Braden Ashe is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-226-4673 or bashe@tribweb.com.

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