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Freeport to spend $10K on sewage overflow problem

| Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 7:33 a.m.

Freeport will spend $10,000 on a plan to resolve the borough's sewage overflow issue during heavy rains.

KLH Engineers will draw up plans based on recommendations from the state Department of Environmental Protection, which recently rejected the borough's original control plan, submitted in 2011.

The borough's storm water and sewage systems are combined. During extremely heavy rains, the treatment system is overwhelmed, borough council President Don Rehner said.

The state requires the borough to have an 85 percent capture rate, and the system can't achieve that during heavy rains, he said.

DEP has not suggested that the borough separate its storm water and sewage system, as it has mandated in other communities, Rehner said.

The system serves about 800 customers.

In other business

Council awarded a contract to Youngblood Paving of Wampum to pave Market Street between Fifth and Seventh streets. The company had the lowest of 10 submitted proposals at $27,332.

The solicitor will review the Youngblood bid and the two other lowest bids from Ron Gillette Inc. of Harrison ($34,518) and Derry Construction of Derry Township ($35,818) to ensure they comply with bid specifications.

Should there would be an issue with Youngblood's bid, the borough would have the option of moving to the second lowest bidder.

PennDOT estimated that the paving project could cost as much as $36,000.

Council sought bids in hopes of getting a lower price.

The borough has applied for a grant from Armstrong County that could yield up to $15,000 to mill and pave the badly deteriorated section.

The borough has $26,000 in its paving fund.

Jodi Weigand is a staff writer for Trib Total Media.

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