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UFO, Big Foot researcher to speak at Tarentum museum

Stan Gordon UFO expert

What: “Strange Encounters of Pennsylvania” by Stan Gordon

Where: Heritage Museum, 224 E. Seventh Ave., Tarentum

When: 1 p.m. May 10

Cost: $5 for entrance into the museum (Gordon's talk is included with admission); free to Alle-Kiski Valley Historical Society members and veterans; light refreshments will follow the program.

Details: www.akvhs.org

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By R.A. Monti
Sunday, May 4, 2014, 9:00 p.m.
 

Stan Gordon doesn't think we're alone, and he has proof.

Gordon, self-proclaimed UFO and Big Foot researcher, will present his decades of research on supernatural findings May 10 at the Allegheny-Kiski Valley Historical Society's Heritage Museum.

“I started doing this in 1959 when I was 10,” Gordon says. “I began to go out in the field to obtain firsthand knowledge through investigation.”

Gordon, who is retired after selling electronics for 40 years, says there are hundreds, if not thousands, of documented sightings of UFOs throughout Western Pennsylvania.

One of the most famous — the “Kecksburg UFO Incident” — has maintained Gordon's attention for years.

“I've been working on it since the day it happened. I was 16 years old,” he says of the event that happened in Mt. Pleasant, and which he'll profile in his talk at the museum.

The incident happened Dec. 9, 1965, when residents of Kecksburg claimed to see something fall from the sky and into a nearby forest. Government officials claimed an investigation turned up nothing, but many still question those results.

For Gordon, the incident started a lifetime of investigating the unusual.

“I started my UFO hotline in 1969,” Gordon says. “I've been taking calls since then.

“I get calls every day on current or past cases. It's a constant barrage.”

The museum is pleased to have Gordon, even if he isn't a typical speaker.

“Even though it's a little different than our normal programs, we're hoping that it will strike the interest of people to come and see our museum,” says Dolly Mistrik, the president of the Allegheny-Kiski Valley Historical Society. “We hope people can have a better understanding of our museum,” she says, “and other strange things that happen around us.”

Mistrik says the museum will open at 11 a.m. the day of Gordon's talk and stay open until the last visitor leaves.

“We want our normal patrons and new patrons to enjoy this,” she says.

Cheryl Alsippi, a museum volunteer and organizer of the event, considers Gordon fascinating.

“I attend paranormal conferences and have met him a few times,” Alsippi says. “He's a very good speaker and always has something new.

“I'm a paranormal researcher myself,” she says. “It's always good for everyone to attend and look at what facts are available.

Gordon said he welcomes nonbelievers as well as believers.

“A lot of the people who call me say they never would have believed in these things unless they saw them,” he says.

Gordon admits that many of the calls he gets aren't about the supernatural.

“One thing I've found is that these reports may seem very strange and unusual, but a high percentage are manmade or natural,” says Gordon, who has never seen a UFO or Big Foot. “For about 99 percent of the things people see, there's an explanation.

“It's that other one percent.”

The past year has seen an uptick in odd sightings, Gordon claims.

“We're getting reports of large structured craft that aren't easily dismissed.

“Disc-shaped, cigar-shaped, flying objects have been seen more recently the last few years in this area,” he says. “One of the most incredible (sightings) is from last June 1 in North Huntingdon, “A woman and her child saw a huge object hovering 60 feet above the highway. It was taking up four lanes. She had to drive under it, and when she did, all of the electronics on her dashboard went out.

“She couldn't get the camera to work on her iPhone.”

Gordon says more than anything else, he hopes that he can help people understand they're not the only ones to have these things happen.

“Quite often, people will want to tell me about their experiences,” he says. “People come up to me and share their experiences and are happy to hear they weren't alone.

“People have life-changing experiences,” he says. “They don't want to be made fun of or be outcast.

“They just know what they saw.”

R. A. Monti is a contributing writer for Trib Total Media.

 

 
 


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