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Woman accused of driving drunk, head-butting Springdale police officer

| Saturday, June 7, 2014, 1:16 a.m.

A woman accused of driving drunk drove into the path of a tanker truck on Pittsburgh Street in Springdale on Friday morning and later head-butted a policewoman, authorities said.

Nicole Deak, 31, no address available, was taken to a hospital for treatment following the 10:30 a.m. crash.

About two hours later, she was brought to the Springdale police station. Springdale police Chief Julio F. Medeiros III said Deak head-butted Officer Amanda Duncan while in custody.

Duncan was struck in the face, the chief said. The extent of her injury was not known.

Medeiros said Deak is a suspect in two earlier hit-and-run wrecks. His department is investigating with East Deer and Cheswick police because a car with a similar description was involved in wrecks in each town at about 8:30 a.m. Friday, in addition to theft.

Medeiros said Deak pulled from a side street in Springdale and smashed her car into the truck near LaNova Pizzeria in the 800 block of Pittsburgh Street.

The car and the tanker, with a cab displaying the name Advantage Tank Lines, were heavily damaged.

Advantage Tank Lines is based in North Canton, Ohio. No one returned calls inquiring about the truck driver's condition.

Deak's condition was not available.

In addition to aggravated assault on a police officer, Deak is accused of driving while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, driving while her license is suspended for a previous drunken driving arrest, reckless driving, receiving stolen property, three counts of reckless endangerment and related charges.

The wreck blocked busy Pittsburgh Street until a special tow truck from Brackenridge could pull the disabled tanker away. Traffic flow returned to normal along the borough's main artery by 12:20 p.m.

Springdale firefighters assisted at the scene.

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