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Kiski Valley wastewater authority's new plant manager hopes to be on job by early August

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By George Guido
Thursday, July 17, 2014, 12:41 a.m.
 

The Kiski Valley Water Pollution Control Authority's new plant manager hopes to be on the job by early August.

Dennis Duryea was introduced to the authority's board of directors Wednesday night.

Duryea, 58, replaces Bob Kossak, who resigned. Duryea works for a Marcellus shale wastewater treatment facility in Butler and is working on wrapping up his employment there.

“I really look forward to this opportunity to serve,” Duryea told the board. ”I want to do everything I can to live up to the expectations of this board. I know there are a lot of challenges.”

Personnel Committee Chairman Pete Pinto said Duryea's new contract “will be ready shortly.”

Duryea's biggest challenge will be to shepherd the authority through the final phases of the $32.4 million sewage treatment plant expansion.

The project will double the authority's treatment capacity.

Craig Bauer of KLH Engineering said the project is about 75 percent complete.

Board OKs budget

The Kiski Valley sewerage authority board approved next year's budget of $4.8 million.

The authority's fiscal year goes from Aug. 1-July 31.

About $2.3 million of the budget will go toward paying various bond issues, including the current plant expansion.

Nearly $1.1 million will be used for wages, salaries and benefits of plant employees.

The authority raises money for its budget by billing the 13 member municipalities. Those towns bill their sewage customers and set their own rates.

George Guido is a freelance writer for Trib Total Media.

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