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Children learn importance of random acts of kindness at Green Tree library

Megan Guza | The Signal Item - Green Tree Public Library director Adaena Tray helps Alyssa, Bryce and William Naughton with their kind-bombs.
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Megan Guza | The Signal Item</em></div>Green Tree Public Library director Adaena Tray helps Alyssa, Bryce and William Naughton with their kind-bombs.
- A random act of kindness hidden in Green Tree Public Library.
A random act of kindness hidden in Green Tree Public Library.
- Alyssa Naughten works on her kind-bomb.
Alyssa Naughten works on her kind-bomb.
- A kind-bomb made by library director Adaena Tray.
A kind-bomb made by library director Adaena Tray.
- Claire Caps watches her grandchildren Bryce and William Naughton work on their kind-bomb messages.
Claire Caps watches her grandchildren Bryce and William Naughton work on their kind-bomb messages.
Wednesday, July 24, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
 

You've heard of photo-bombing and yarn-bombing, but now kind-bombing has also made its way to Pittsburgh.

Children at Green Tree Public Library spent an hour Wednesday afternoon creating colorful, positive message cards to leave in books throughout the library for unsuspecting patrons.

“I think people associate random acts of kindness with purchasing something – lunch for the person behind them in line or leaving a lottery ticket on a park bench,” library director Adaena Tray said. “This is something the kids can see, and it's free.”

Armed with markers, crayons, stickers and other art supplies, the children wrote out cards with messages like “keep smiling” and “you are loved.”

“I just think it's about the Golden Rule,” Tray said. “It's important to pay it forward. If you have the time or money to do something nice for somebody, you should do it.”

Claire Capes of the West End brought her three grandchildren to participate in the program.

“I'd like the kids to do this rather than be self-centered,” she said. “I want them to learn to give of themselves for free rather than always expect to get paid.”

Children added tags to their messages reading “Please enjoy this random act of kindness.” They could either hide the card completely within the book or attach a string to the tag and allow it to hang out of the book.

Tray also left the children with ideas for random acts of kindness to do outside of the program.

“It sets up good habits for children this age,” she said. “It teaches them about being a good friend, a good neighbor and a good citizen.”

Megan Guza is a staff writer for Trib Total Meda. She can be reached at 412-388-5810 or mguza@tribweb.com.

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