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Carnegie officials get going about proposed GetGo

| Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013, 3:21 p.m.

Carnegie officials say they are excited about the prospect of a GetGo convenience store and gas station coming to town.

Borough manager Stephen Beuter said the project would mesh nicely with the number of smaller specialty businesses that have opened in the borough.

“This project would create a nice balance,” he said.

The gas station, café and convenience store complex still is in the planning stages, but Giant Eagle Inc. representatives gave some details to the borough council during a Nov. 4 workshop meeting.

The location, in the 300 block of East Main Street, includes eight parcels of land between East Main and Lydia streets. Giant Eagle still is in the process of acquiring all the property, some of which includes privately owned businesses. The entire area is about 1.5 acres. The business would be open 24 hours.

Giant Eagle spokesman Dick Roberts said developers still are working to get the proper approvals to move forward with the project.

The gas-station portion of the business would include eight gas pumps with 16 spaces — one on each side of the pump. The indoor café area would include 34 seats, and there would be 16 seats outside. The entire land area, Giant Eagle representatives said, would have to be raised because part of it is in a flood plain.

Carnegie Mayor Jack Kobistek said that while the land would have to be rezoned for commercial use, he welcomes the idea of the convenience store coming to the borough.

The borough will benefit from the traffic and tax revenue, he said.

“I think these types of convenience stores that double as restaurants have become extremely popular with today's consumer,” he said. “And GetGo is very popular in today's market.”

Megan Guza is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-388-5810 or mguza@tribweb.com.

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