TribLIVE

| Neighborhoods

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Agreement a win-win for Carnegie, emergency services

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 9:01 p.m.
 

An ordinance passed last week by the Carnegie Borough Council spells out the expectations between the borough and the Carnegie Volunteer Fire & Rescue Bureau.

The ordinance also named the bureau the official fire company of the borough.

“We haven't done that in the past,” council President Pat Catena said. “The old ordinance recognized the paid fire department, which has been disbanded since the 70s.”

Representatives from the fire department could not be reached for comment.

The fire company is to provide the borough with emergency services and non-emergency and public service events or functions, such as clean-up after storms, according to the ordinance.

The borough, in turn, is required by the ordinance to establish a funding amount for the fire company in the borough's annual budget. The ordinance spells out what the money can be used for. The department must document how it uses the money.

“The borough is ultimately obligated to financially supporting the fire department,” Catena said.

The department must appoint a borough liaison who will meet with council every month to report on activities at the department. In October, the liaison, fire chief and borough president will meet to provide council with a report on operations and needs for the next year.

The ordinance had been in the works for two years. Council members had cited financial questions as hang-ups in negotiations with the fire department, namely the department's mortgage. The department still owes $680,000 on the building, and some council members looked to the department refinance the mortgage.

Megan Guza is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-388-5810 or mguza@tribweb.com.

Add Megan Guza to your Google+ circles.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read Carlynton

  1. Speeders under the watchful eye of South Fayette police
  2. Collier rejects zoning change for townhomes
  3. ‘FUN-Raiser’ to help Carnegie Salvation Army make up for lost donations
  4. Carnegie skatepark repaired after spray-paint vandalism
  5. South Fayette hires new high school principal
  6. Oyler: Document provides plenty of details about C.P. Mayer Brick Co.
  7. WPIAL honor adds to Nevillewood golfer’s legacy
  8. Town Talk: Husband, wife to celebrate 91st, 88th birthdays
  9. Heidelberg playground overhaul lacks many key touches