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Chartiers Valley student creates pop art with a Coke

Submitted - Emily Smith
<div style='float:right;width:100%;' align='right'><em>Submitted</em></div>Emily Smith
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Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 9:00 p.m.
 

Chartiers Valley High School freshman Emily Smith is bringing a new definition to the term “pop art.”

Her digital rendition of a Coca-Cola bottle won third place in this year's Congressional Art Competition and will be displayed in the Washington, D.C., office of U.S. Representative Tim Murphy's (R-Upper Saint Clair).

Smith, 15, created the piece for her “Digital Art and Design” class.

“I don't even drink pop,” she said. “I thought it would be cool to make it a black and white image and then see the contrast.”

Done entirely on the computer, the piece began as an outline of the bottle. She then placed each hue inside the outline and blended them together. She said the red background makes the image pop.

Her teacher, Chris McHugh, called said the piece was “striking.”

“Digital art assignments were coming in, and I knew the deadline (for the competition) was soon,” he said. “I was going through and grading pieces, and when I saw Emily's final piece, I thought, ‘Wow, this is really awesome.'”

McHugh said he will be in Fairfax, Va., for a workshop this summer, and he plans to take a trip into Washington to see Smith's art.

This is the second year for the “Digital Art and Design” class, and, Smith said, it is the first time she has worked with digital art.

Smith said her mother and grandmother have helped foster her love of art, and it is something she hopes to continue doing through high school and college.

“You can do whatever you want. You're free to do whatever,” she said. “And if it doesn't work out, you can change it.”

Megan Guza is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 412-388-5810 or mguza@tribweb.com.

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