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Failed inspections shut down McKees Rocks pet control service

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Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, 9:02 p.m.
 

Sharpsburg is one of many communities left without an animal control service after its provider had its license suspended.

Triangle Pet Control Services Inc. of McKees Rocks had its license suspended by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture last week after it failed inspections this summer.

Police Chief Leo Rudzki said the manager of the facility, whom he said the borough has had a good relationship with, is working on reopening the facility.

“He's attempting to get the licensing in his name, that takes a few weeks,” Rudzki said.

The dog warden for Allegheny County will take over services for now, Rudzki said.

County services will be available Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. except for holidays.

In comparison, Triangle Pet was on call for the borough and would be in town once every few days.

Mayor Richard Panza said he worried about the hours when the county is not available.

“The weekends are going to be bad,” Panza said.

Panza suggested looking into other services such as Delmont-based Hoffman Kennels, which provides animal control services for other communities.

“If this doesn't get settled and they don't get their license back, we may as well be on the top of the list for Hoffman,” Panza said.

The North Hills Council of Governments, of which Sharpsburg is a member, planned to discuss the problem and advise communities on what to do, borough secretary Jan Barbus said.

Rudzki said he's hopeful the borough won't have any problems during the transition.

“Let's cross our fingers until we figure out what we're going to do,” Rudzki said.

Tom McGee is an associate editor for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 412-856-7400, ext. 1513 or tmcgee@tribweb.com.

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